Lymphoma drug used to treat skin disorders

December 14, 2007

Dayton, OH - December 14, 2007 - A new review article from the journal Dermatologic Therapy reveals that rituximab, a drug used to treat lymphoma, is now becoming used by dermatologists to treat various dangerous skin diseases.

Originally developed as the standard therapy in treating aggressive lymphomas, the drug rituximab is showing increased non-cancer use. The study reviewed the off-label uses of rituximab in dermatology and found that it successfully treated patients with various kinds of blistering skin disease, including pemphigus vulgaris, dermatomyositis, and paraneoplastic pemphigus.

Newer, safer treatments are being studied for serious dermatologic disorders, and rituximab's efficacy has been shown in a variety of dangerous skin problems. "As case reports and randomized trials explore the utility of rituximab," the authors note, "the indications for rituximab will continue to be defined."
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This study is published in the journal Dermatologic Therapy. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

To view the abstract for this article, please click here.

Michael P. Heffernan, MD, is affiliated with Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio and can be reached for questions at Michael.heffernan@wright.edu.

Dermatologic Therapy was created to fill an important void in the dermatologic literature: the lack of a readily available source of up-to-date information on the treatment of specific cutaneous diseases and the practical application of specific treatment modalities. The information contained in each issue is so practical and detailed that the reader should be able to directly apply various treatment approaches to daily clinical situations.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or http://interscience.wiley.com .

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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