ACR in Choosing Wisely campaign to promote wise use of resources among physicians and patients

December 14, 2011

As part of its ongoing efforts to ensure safe, effective and appropriate medical imaging, the American College of Radiology has joined the ABIM Foundation and eight other medical specialty societies in Choosing Wisely. The new campaign promotes wise choices by physicians and patients to improve health outcomes, avoid unnecessary interventions and make efficient use of healthcare dollars.

The ACR will develop a list of five things to reduce unnecessary imaging exams ordered by physicians and improve quality of care. The list names imaging exams whose necessity should be discussed before being ordered. The list also equips providers with steps to help ensure safe, appropriate use of scans.

"Medical imaging exams are a perfect fit for Choosing Wisely. Scans lower healthcare costs by replacing more invasive surgeries and allowing for shorter hospital stays. Although imaging use is down significantly since 2008 and Medicare spending on imaging is the same as in 2004, opportunities remain to ensure appropriate ordering of scans. As greater access to imaging is directly tied to increased life expectancy, ACR will identify areas where care can be improved without restricting patient access," said John A. Patti, MD, FACR, chair of the ACR Board of Chancellors.

The ACR is dedicated to putting quality and safety first. ACR Appropriateness Criteria help doctors prescribe the best imaging exam for a patient's condition and reduce unnecessary scans by informing doctors when no scan is necessary at all. For decades, ACR facility accreditation programs have set stringent physician, equipment and personnel standards and remain the Gold Standard in quality assurance.

The College is a founding member of the Image Wisely (imagewisely.org) and Image Gently (imagegently.org) initiatives and established the national Dose Index Registry. All of these efforts help lower radiation dose from imaging exams. The ACR also co-founded radiologyinfo.org to provide patients with accessible information on imaging scans and radiation therapy.

"The ACR urges all imaging providers to take advantage of ACR accreditation, Appropriateness Criteria and the Dose Index Registry to raise quality and safety and ensure appropriate care. By basing policies on current evidence and use of existing quality and safety tools, we can make efficient use of healthcare dollars and keep imaging safe, effective and accessible to those who need it," said Dr. Patti.
-end-
The ACR list, and those of other Choosing Wisely partners, will be released in April 2012. To learn more, visit ChoosingWisely.org.

To arrange an interview with an ACR spokesperson, please contact Shawn Farley at 703.648.8936 or PR@acr.org.

American College of Radiology

Related Medical Imaging Articles from Brightsurf:

Improved medical imaging improves cancer staging
Prof. TIAN Chao's group improved the imaging quality and 3D construction of the photoacoustic imaging, and applied them to in vivo sentinel lymph node imaging.

AI techniques in medical imaging may lead to incorrect diagnoses
Machine learning and AI are highly unstable in medical image reconstruction, and may lead to false positives and false negatives, a new study suggests.

Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde.

Advanced medical imaging combined with genomic analysis could help treat cancer patients
Melding the genetic and cellular analysis of tumors with how they appear in medical images could give physicians new insights into how to best treat patients, especially those with brain cancer, according to a new study led by TGen.

Low doses of radiation used in medical imaging lead to mutations in cell cultures
Common medical imaging procedures use low doses of radiation that are believed to be safe.

Use of medical imaging
This observational study looked at patterns of use for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine imaging in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2016.

Medical imaging rates continue to rise despite push to reduce their use
The rates of use of CT, MRI and other scans have continued to increase in both the US and Ontario, Canada, according to a new study of more than 135 million imaging exams conducted by researchers at UC Davis, UC San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente.

Two-in-one contrast agent for medical imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualizes internal body structures, often with the help of contrast agents to enhance sensitivity.

Medical imaging rates during pregnancy
Researchers looked at rates of medical imaging (CT, MRI, conventional x-rays, angiography, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine) during pregnancy in this observational study that included nearly 3.5 million pregnant women in the United States and Canada from 1996 to 2016.

Scientists discover new method for developing tracers used for medical imaging
University of North Carolina researchers discovered a method for creating radioactive tracers to better track pharmaceuticals in the body as well as image diseases, such as cancer, and other medical conditions.

Read More: Medical Imaging News and Medical Imaging Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.