Camera phones can be a valuable tool for remote diagnosis and (peer) education

December 14, 2011

Camera phones may be the future for assistance in medical diagnosis, especially in remote areas, according to a new study published Dec. 14 in the online journal PLoS ONE.

The researchers, led by Coosje Tuijn of the Royal Tropical Institute in the Netherlands, conducted a feasibility study in Uganda and showed that a 2 megapixel camera was sufficient to capture a clear microscopy image that could be sent to a website for confirmation and additional analysis by a specialist. The specialist could then provide feedback by means of a text message.

With some further system optimization, doctors may soon be able to take advantage of this virtual network to adequately help more patients in less time, which would be particularly valuable in remote and sparsely populated areas. Such technological advances could "improve diagnosis in peripheral health settings by empowering undereducated and insufficiently experienced health care and laboratory workers to meet quality standards", says Dr. Tuijn.
-end-
Citation: Tuijn CJ, Hoefman BJ, van Beijma H, Oskam L, Chevrollier N (2011) Data and Image Transfer Using Mobile Phones to Strengthen Microscopy-Based Diagnostic Services in Low and Middle Income Country Laboratories. PLoS ONE 6(12): e28348. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028348

Financial Disclosure: Funding came from the core funding of the institutions involved. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript'' to the funding.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Disclaimer: This press release refers to upcoming articles in PLoS ONE. The releases have been provided by the article authors and/or journal staff. Any opinions expressed in these are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLoS. PLoS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

About PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE is the first journal of primary research from all areas of science to employ a combination of peer review and post-publication rating and commenting, to maximize the impact of every report it publishes. PLoS ONE is published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS), the open-access publisher whose goal is to make the world's scientific and medical literature a public resource.

All works published in PLoS ONE are Open Access. Everything is immediately available--to read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise use--without cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. For more information about PLoS ONE relevant to journalists, bloggers and press officers, including details of our press release process and our embargo policy, see the everyONE blog at http://everyone.plos.org/media.

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