Improved techniques may help recovery and prevent incidents of missing drivers with dementia

December 14, 2012

Tampa, FL (Dec. 14, 2012)-- A new study focusing on how people with dementia become lost while driving, how missing drivers are found, and the role of public notification systems like Silver Alert in these discoveries suggests techniques that may help recover drivers with dementia and prevent potentially harmful incidents.

The study was led by principal investigator Meredeth A. Rowe, RN, PhD, FGSA, FAAN, professor and endowed chair at the University of South Florida College of Nursing. The findings were published online last month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society: Missing Drivers with Dementia: Antecedents and Recovery.

Based on the study results, the research team reported several recommendations to help guide local policies and training for Silver Alert-type programs that broadcast information about missing seniors with Alzheimer's disease, dementia or other cognitive deficits, including: "With the baby-boomer generation getting older, the number of the people living with Alzheimer's disease is on the rise," Dr. Rowe said. "Most Americans depend on driving their own car to meet their transportation needs, even for the most basic needs such as food. It will be critical to identify other means of transportation for people with dementia (PWD) to facilitate driving retirement. This strategy will be the most effective intervention to reduce and prevent incidents of missing PWDs. Strategies commonly recommended, such a hiding the car keys, are potentially protective only in a small number of cases."

According to Alzheimer's Association, 5.4 million Americans live with Alzheimer's disease, including 800,000 who live alone. One in eight older Americans lives with the memory-robbing disease, including 450,000 Floridians age 65 or older. These statistics highlight the need to find more effective ways to search for missing drivers with dementia and reduce missing incidents.

Dr. Rowe and her colleagues analyzed 156 records from the Florida Silver Alert program for October 2008 through May 2010. These alerts are issued on digital highway signs and news broadcasts in Florida to assist law enforcement officials and the general public in identifying and safely returning cognitively impaired drivers.

The researchers found that most missing drivers were men, ages 58 to 94, who were cared for by a spouse. Most got lost on routine, caregiver-sanctioned trips to usual locations. Only 15 percent were found while driving, with most discovered in or near a parked car -- and law enforcement officers recovered the large majority of drivers with dementia.

In addition, only 40 percent were found in the county where they were reported missing, and 10 percent were found in a different state. Another 15 percent were found in dangerous situations such as stopped on railroad tracks. There was a 5 percent mortality rate in the study population, with those living alone more likely to be found dead than alive.

"While some PWDs may continue to drive safely, it is imperative that we identify individuals who will get lost, determine predictors of modifiable outcomes, and establish policies that will improve location of those individuals who get lost," said study co-author James E. Galvin, MD, MPH, professor of neurology and psychiatry New York University Langone Medical Center.

A comprehensive Silver Alert program that includes law enforcement and community education as well as rapid alerts is critical to finding missing drivers, the researchers conclude.

Their findings led to recommendations for an additional study on how notifications be more effectively delivered to facilitate increased recoveries from "Good Samaritan" citizens.

The researchers emphasize that getting cognitively impaired people to retire from driving may be the single most effective measure for prevent missing incidents that may lead to injury or death.

"Important aspects of successful driving retirement include a partnership between the healthcare practitioner and caregiver to support the decision for driving retirement, the identification of local and state programs... and assistance in finding alternative forms of transportation in the community," they report.
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USF Health's mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of PublicHealth, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician's Group. The University of South Florida is a global research university ranked 50th in the nation by the National Science Foundation for both federal and total research expenditures among all U.S. universities.

NYU Langone Medical Center, a world-class, patient-centered, integrated, academic medical center, is one on the nation's premier centers for excellence in clinical care, biomedical research and medical education. Located in the heart of Manhattan, NYU Langone is composed of four hospitals - Tisch Hospital, its flagship acute care facility; the Hospital for Joint Diseases, one of only five hospitals in the nation dedicated to orthopaedics and rheumatology; Hassenfeld Pediatric Center, a comprehensive pediatric hospital supporting a full array of children's health services; and the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, the world's first university-affiliated facility devoted entirely to rehabilitation

University of South Florida (USF Health)

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