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European Geosciences Union meeting: Media registration now open

December 14, 2016

The 2017 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) provides an opportunity for journalists to hear about the latest research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, and to talk to scientists from all over the world. The meeting, the largest geosciences conference in Europe, brings together over 12,000 researchers, and is taking place in Vienna, Austria, from 23 to 28 April.

The EGU General Assembly is an opportunity for journalists and science writers to learn about new developments in a variety of topics -- including changes in the Arctic, reaching the Paris climate agreement goals, mitigating natural disaster risks, sustainable cities, recent planetary missions, extraterrestrial seismology -- and to interview researchers from Europe and around the world. The preliminary programme for the meeting includes hundreds of scientific sessions.

Members of the media, public information officers and science bloggers (conditions apply) are now invited to register for the meeting online, free of charge, at https://media.egu.eu/registration/. Media registration gives access to the Press Centre, interview rooms equipped with noise reduction material, and other meeting rooms. It also includes a public transportation ticket for Vienna. At the Press Centre, media participants have access to high-speed Internet (LAN and wireless LAN), as well as breakfast, lunch, coffee and refreshments, all available free of charge.

Online pre-registration is open until 13 March. The advanced registration assures that your badge will be waiting for you on your arrival to the conference centre, the Austria Center Vienna. You may also register on-site during the meeting.

Further information about media services at the General Assembly is available at http://media.egu.eu. Closer to the date, this website will feature a full programme of press conferences, which will also be announced in later media advisories. For information on accommodation and travel, please refer to the appropriate sections of the EGU 2017 General Assembly website at http://www.egu2017.eu.

Since two major events will be taking place in Vienna in parallel with the EGU 2017 General Assembly, we recommend booking your accommodation as soon as possible.
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European Geosciences Union

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