Nav: Home

Bring your own (security) disaster

December 14, 2016

Bring your own device (BYOD) to work is common practice these days. Almost everyone has a smart or a tablet and in many office and other jobs, using the device makes workers more effective and more efficient in their work (games and personal social media aside, perhaps). A new study in the International Journal of Teaching and Case Studies suggests, however, that most company IT security managers would prefer employees not to BYOD.

Khaled Zayed of the International School of Management in New York, USA and also Paris, France, reiterates the security and safety concerns that surround BYOD and has carried out a qualitative case study of information technology security managers to determine the industry perspective on BYOD.

"IT is critical in our modern world for doing business and communicating with others," explains Zayed, "Businesses, governments, and individuals rely on internet-enabled technology to achieve this, using mobile devices, e-mails, and social media, and companies around the world conduct business using local and wide area networks and virtual private networks." The social networking servers, process virtualization, and cloud computing present both opportunities for rapid innovation as well as risks to proprietary information, trade secrets and intellectual property, especially when those workers with access to sensitive data use their own devices.

There are security concerns for any networked data and system, viruses and other malware, phishing and hacking attacks, identity theft, data leaks, corporate espionage, denial of service attacks, and of course social engineering and confidence tricks. It has been said many times before that companies must establish strict policies to address the risks, as employees using IT at work and in particular in the context of BYOD are wholly unaware of the risks. If they are aware of the risks they are not necessarily aware of ways to mitigate those risks or how to address problems that arise if their or the company IT systems are compromised.
-end-
Zayed, K. (2016) 'Information security awareness: managing web, mobile and endpoint security; overcoming the challenges of bring your own device', Int. J. Teaching and Case Studies, Vol. 7, Nos. 3/4, pp.271-288.

Inderscience Publishers

Related Social Media Articles:

Social media use by adolescents linked to internalizing behaviors
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that adolescents who spend more than three hours a day on social media are more likely to report high levels of internalizing behaviors compared to adolescents who do not use social media at all.
Social media stress can lead to social media addiction
Social network users risk becoming more and more addicted to social media platforms even as they experience stress from their use.
Many post on social media under the influence of drugs -- and regret it
Posting on social media, texting, and appearing in photos while high is prevalent among people who use drugs--and many regret these behaviors, according to a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health.
'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media
Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher.
How gender inequality is reproduced on social media
Researchers from Higher School of Economics analyzed 62 million public posts on the most popular Russian social networking site VK and found that both men and women mention sons more often than daughters.
More Social Media News and Social Media Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...