Prevent holiday burns, fires

December 15, 2003

MAYWOOD, Ill. - The Burn Center at Loyola University Medical Center is warning the public about the dangers of space heaters and other electrical appliances used to keep warm or decorate homes for the holidays. The tips are available to the public in English and Spanish on Loyola's Web site: www.luhs.org/burnprevention

"Every year we receive patients who are victims of house fires caused by space heaters, " said Dr. Richard L. Gamelli, director, The Burn Center and the Burn and Shock Institute Loyola University Health System. "So many of these injuries are preventable if simple precautions are taken." Gamelli is the Robert J. Freeark, M.D., Professor of Trauma Surgery and professor of Pediatrics, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Loyola's tips cover electrical lights, Christmas trees, candles, space heaters, cooking safety, and bathing. Some key tips for space heater safety include:

Tips for electrical lights, trees include:

Loyola University Health System is providing the following tips on Christmas trees and candles from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) as a public service.

Christmas trees

Candle Safety
Remember that a candle is an open flame. It can easily ignite anything combustible nearby.

Candles and children

Loyola University Medical Center's Burn Center is a major treatment and research center for burn care in the Midwest and a leader throughout the world. A multidisciplinary team, which includes resuscitation, pulmonary support, wound management, nutritional support and rehabilitation personnel, provide care in the center.

The Burn Center has approximately 70 highly trained staff, including nurses, patient care technicians, service coordinators and service associates. The center is one of the busiest in the Midwest treating more than 400 patients in the hospital each year and more than 2000 in its clinic. Approximately 40 percent of these patients are children.

The Burn Center provides comprehensive care for adults and children with thermal injuries, electrical burns, chemical injury, frostbite, toxic epidural necrolysis, inhalation injury and complex soft tissue infections.
-end-
Loyola University Health System, a wholly owned subsidiary of Loyola University Chicago, includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC), 18 specialty and primary care centers in the western and southwestern suburbs, the Loyola Ambulatory Surgery Center at Oakbrook, the Loyola Imaging Center at Oakbrook Terrace, a joint venture with the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and serves as co-owner-operator of RML Specialty Hospital, a long-term-care facility for ventilator-dependent patients in suburban Hinsdale, Ill. LUMC, a private, academic health care institution, is nationally recognized for its specialty care and research in such areas as cancer, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, pediatrics, neonatology and neurosciences, burn and trauma care and organ transplantation. The 73-acre campus in Maywood, Ill., includes the 523-bed licensed Loyola Hospital with a Level I trauma center, Russo Surgical Pavilion, Cardiovascular Institute, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital of LUMC, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, the Loyola Outpatient Center, 24-bed RIC & LOYOLA acute rehabilitation unit, the region's largest burn unit and one of the Midwest's largest and most comprehensive organ transplant programs.

Loyola University Health System

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