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Press registration opens for 2016 spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society

December 15, 2015

Journalists may now apply for press credentials for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 251st National Meeting & Exposition, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year. It will be held March 13-17 in San Diego.

Thousands of scientists and others are expected to gather for more than 12,500 presentations on a wide variety of new discoveries. Many of the findings have implications for everyday life, offering print, broadcast and online journalists a rich assortment of spot news and feature possibilities. The topics include food and nutrition, medicine, health, energy, the environment and other fields where chemistry plays a central role. Some of those presentations will connect with the meeting's theme, "Computers in Chemistry."

The ACS Office of Public Affairs will operate a press center in the San Diego Convention Center, Room 17A (mezzanine). It will include a press conference room and a news media workroom fully staffed to assist in arranging interviews. The press center will have wireless Internet access, computers and refreshments.

Embargoed copies of press releases and a press conference schedule will be available in early March. Reporters planning to cover the meeting from their home bases will have access to the press conferences on YouTube.

The ACS provides complimentary registration to national meetings to reporters (staff and freelance) and public information officers from government, non-profit and educational institutions. Marketing and public relations professionals, lobbyists and scientists do not qualify as press and must register via the main meeting registration page. Journal managing editors, book commissioning editors, acquisitions editors, publishers and those who do not produce news for a publication or institution also do not qualify.
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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

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