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Two major groups of rabies virus display distinct evolutionary trends

December 15, 2016

Using hundreds of viral genome sequences, scientists have shown that two major groups of rabies virus have unique evolutionary tendencies. Their findings are presented in a new study published in PLOS Pathogens.

Diseases that jump from other vertebrate hosts to humans are a major public health threat, but the evolutionary mechanisms behind these jumps are poorly understood. With its long history of jumping between host species, the rabies virus offers a good opportunity to identify evolutionary patterns associated with such shifts.

Cécile Troupin of Institut Pasteur, Paris, and colleagues compared 321 viral genome sequences collected from 66 countries over 65 years. The analysis revealed very different evolutionary patterns for bat-related rabies, which is found in bats and some carnivores; versus dog-related rabies, which is responsible for almost all human cases of rabies and is found in both dogs and wild carnivores.

The data suggest that different subgroups of bat-related rabies do not evolve uniformly, but dog-related rabies usually evolves at a steady rate. For dog-related rabies, host jumping was linked to multiple evolutionary patterns, such as parallel changes in amino acid sequences between different host species. The data also suggest that dog-related rabies may not need to evolve much to jump to new carnivore hosts.

Looking deeper into dog-related rabies, the scientists found evidence to suggest that, after trade between continents began in the 15th century, dog-related rabies rapidly spread worldwide. The authors say that the particular combination of species currently infected by dog-related rabies probably arose as a combined effect of historical spread by humans and host jumping.

"The data indicate that different subgroups of bat-related rabies do not evolve uniformly, but dog-related rabies usually evolves at a steady rate," the authors explain. "For dog-related rabies, host jumping was linked to multiple evolutionary patterns, such as parallel changes in amino acid sequences between different host species, suggesting that dog-related rabies may not need to evolve much to jump to new carnivore hosts."
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In your coverage please use this URL to provide access to the freely available article in PLOS Pathogens: http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1006041

Please contact plospathogens@plos.org if you would like more information.

Funding: This work was supported by European Union Seventh Framework Programme PREDEMICS (grant number 278433) and by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (grant number BSV3-0019). The Genomics Platform is member of "France Génomique" consortium (ANR10-INBS-09-08). SD is supported by a University of Melbourne McKenzie fellowship. ECH is supported by an NHMRC Australia Fellowship. HB and CS were supported by the European Virus Archive goes Global (EVAg) project that has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 653316. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Citation: Troupin C, Dacheux L, Tanguy M, Sabeta C, Blanc H, Bouchier C, et al. (2016) Large-Scale Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals the Complex Evolutionary History of Rabies Virus in Multiple Carnivore Hosts. PLoS Pathog 12(12): e1006041. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1006041

PLOS

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