Nav: Home

Study estimates 1,900 arrest-related deaths occurred in US between June 2015-May 2016

December 15, 2016

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC - An estimated 1,900 people died in the United States during arrest or while in police custody June 2015 through May 2016, according to a new report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and RTI International.

The report, led by researchers at RTI, provides preliminary results of the BJS's redesign of the Arrest-Related Deaths component of the Deaths in Custody Reporting Program, which was established in response to the Death in Custody Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-297) (reauthorized in 2014).

The arrest-related deaths report represents a national accounting of persons who died during the process of arrest, including justifiable homicides by law enforcement personnel and deaths attributed to suicide, accidental injury, and natural causes. The arrest-related death program redesign relies on a hybrid, two-step process to identify, confirm, and collect information about arrest-related deaths.

"The redesigned arrest-related deaths program combines information from media sources, law enforcement agencies, medical examiners, and coroner's offices to both identify and confirm arrest-related deaths," said Duren Banks, Ph.D., senior research criminologist at RTI and lead author of the report. "This mixed method approach results in a more complete picture of the scope of arrest-related deaths in the U.S."

To identify potential arrest-related deaths, the researchers conducted a standardized review of media articles. The review identified 1,348 potential arrest-related deaths in the United States from June 1, 2015 through March 31, 2016, an average of 135 deaths per month.

Researchers found that potential arrest-related deaths occurred in all 50 states during that period, with the largest number occurring in California (224).

Washington, DC, Wyoming and New Mexico had the highest rate of potential arrest-related deaths per million residents. New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island had the lowest rate of potential arrest-related deaths per million residents compared to other states.

Following the media review, researchers conducted a survey of law enforcement agencies and medical examiner/coroners' offices for official reports and information about the 379 arrest-related deaths identified in June, July and August 2015.

The survey findings indicated 425 arrest-related deaths occurred during that time period, an additional 12 percent or 45 than reported in the media. Of these 425 deaths, 64 percent were classified as homicide, 18 percent as suicide, and 11 as accidents.

Based on the information from the media sources collected from June 2015 through May 2016 and assuming another 12 percent identified directly from agencies, researchers estimated 1,900 arrest-related deaths occurred in the United States annually during the study period.
-end-


RTI International

Related Homicide Articles:

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports.
In Brazil, homicides are decreasing in big cities, increasing in smaller towns: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study maps changes in homicide rates across Brazil from 2000 through 2014.
Handgun purchaser licensing laws are associated with lower firearm homicides, suicides
State handgun purchaser licensing laws--which go beyond federal background checks by requiring a prospective buyer to apply for a license or permit from state or local law enforcement--appear to be highly effective at reducing firearm homicide and suicide rates.
Risk of suicide, homicide, unintentional firearm deaths at home
Personal protection is often cited as a reason for owning a firearm.
Fewer liquor stores may lead to less homicide
Reducing the number of businesses in Baltimore that sell alcohol in urban residential areas may lower the homicide rate, according to new research.
Pregnant women in Louisiana at increased risk for homicide
Pooja Mehta, MD, clinical assistant professor of obstetrics & gynecology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was a member of a research team that found 13% of deaths occurring during or up to one year after pregnancy among Louisiana women in 2016-17 were homicides.
A study shows growth trends in female homicide victims in Spain spanning over a century
In a groundbreaking study, research carried out between the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and the University of Lausanne (UNIL, Switzerland) has compiled data on homicide victims in Spain, disaggregated by gender, from 1910 to 2014.
Homicide is a leading cause of pregnancy-associated death in Louisiana
Homicide is a leading cause of death among pregnant and postpartum women in Louisiana, according to an analysis of birth and death records from 2016 and 2017.
Homicide among pregnant, postpartum women in Louisiana
Researchers examined how often homicide was the cause of death among women in Louisiana who were pregnant or up to one year postpartum compared with other causes.
Marijuana detected in homicide victims nearly doubles
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health assessed the time trends in alcohol and marijuana detected in homicide victims and found that the prevalence of marijuana almost doubled, increasing from 22 percent in 2004 to 42 percent in 2016.
More Homicide News and Homicide Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.