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Facial feminization surgery for transgender patients

December 15, 2016

A new article published online by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery examines the role of rhinoplasty in facial feminization surgery for transgender patients.

Facial feminization surgery includes a group of procedures to soften and modify facial features perceived as masculine. Along with forehead reconstruction, nose feminization is one of the most common procedures in facial feminization surgery.

Raúl J. Bellinga, M.D., F.E.B.O.M.S., of Marbella High Care International Hospital, Málaga, Spain, and coauthors conducted a case series study and examined 200 feminization rhinoplasties in conjunction with lip-lift techniques and forehead reconstruction.
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To learn more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Facial Plast Surg. Published December 15, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2016.1572; available pre-embargo at the For The Media website)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

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