Three top minority science students win scholarships

December 15, 1999

Applications Now Being Accepted for Next Year

Academic scholarships of up to $2,500 each have been awarded to local minority chemistry students through the American Chemical Society/Bayer Scholars Program, sponsored by Bayer and the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. A list of the winners is attached.

ACS/Bayer scholarships are awarded to incoming college freshmen, sophomores and juniors in four-year chemistry and biochemistry programs. The scholarships are based on merit and financial need, and are targeted to specific geographic areas.

The Bayer Scholarships are part of the ACS Scholars program, which was developed to encourage African-American, Hispanic and Native American college students to pursue careers in the chemical sciences. Requirements include U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status, a "B" or better grade-point average or the equivalent, and demonstrated financial need. ACS matches funds contributed by companies such as Bayer, which may have additional eligibility criteria.

Almost 300 students have been awarded scholarships to attend chemistry-related programs this year in more than 160 institutions in the United States and Puerto Rico. More than 700 students have participated in the program since its inception in 1995, receiving a total of $3.7 million dollars in scholarships.

Applications for the 2000-2001 school year are being accepted now through February 15, 2000. Information about the program, including eligibility criteria and application procedures, can be obtained from the American Chemical Society website at www.acs.org/pafgen/minority/maintro.htm; by sending an e-mail to scholars@acs.org; or by calling 1-800-227-5558, extension 6250.
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A nonprofit organization with a membership of nearly 159,000 chemists and chemical engineers, the American Chemical Society publishes scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences, and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio. (http://www.acs.org)

American Chemical Society

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