A new vaccine against Salmonella

December 16, 2004

Javier Ochoa Repáraz defended his PhD thesis at the University of Navarre Faculty of Science on the development of an acellular vaccine aginst Salmonella enteritidis. This involves a world pandemia considered to be the most importante zoonosis or illness/infection transmissible salmonellosis by animals to humans under natural conditions. It is estimated that the incidence of acute worldwide is more than a thousand million cases per annum and causes three million deaths.

The project developed by Javier Ochoa centred on the investigation of a new vaccine based on the encapsulation of the components of the Salmonella enteritidis cell sheath. The vaccine has shown itself to be efficacious in mice infected with this illness and is currently being employed on experimental farms of Hipra laboratories in Gerona, a compnay involved in the control of pathogens in birds.

Low efficacy of vaccines applied

Farmyard fowl and their derivatives are recognised as the most important source of infection of Salmonella enteritidis in humans. Both the World Health organisation (WHO) and the European Union have laid down guidelines in order to erradicate the infection in fowl, the benefits of this for humans being evident. It is generally accepted that the most practical measure is vaccination, as the easiest to apply and the most economic but, to date, all thos applied have proved to have low efficacy.

In Spain, Salmonella enteritidis is the bacteria that causes 85% of food-provoked gastroenteritis. In the concrete case of Navarre, there were 343 food poisoning cases in 2003, of which 79 were grouped together in 14 outbreaks, 12 due to Salmonella.
-end-


Elhuyar Fundazioa

Related Salmonella Articles from Brightsurf:

Sneaky salmonella finds a backdoor into plants
Researchers have discovered that bacteria such as salmonella, E.coli and listeria have a backdoor to take advantage of humans' reliance on leafy greens for a healthy diet.

Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
New study demonstrates how monitoring all cellular proteins over time and space can improve our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

Researchers find one-two punch may help fight against Salmonella
Researchers found that dephostatin does not kill Salmonella or stop it from growing.

Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process
Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two hours and the whole identification process within eight hours.

The discovery of ancient Salmonella
Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link agriculture and herding with emergence of new disease.

The function of new microRNAs are identified in Salmonella and Shigella infections
The research, published in Nature Microbiology, could help the search for more effective medicine and delves deeper into understanding the role of microRNAs in gene expression.

Salmonella the most common cause of foodborne outbreaks in the European Union
Nearly one in three foodborne outbreaks in the EU in 2018 were caused by Salmonella.

The nature of salmonella is changing -- and it's meaner
Salmonella is acting up in Michigan, and it could be a model for what's happening in other states, according to a new Michigan State University study.

Salmonella -- how the body fights back
New research shows how our immune system fights back against Salmonella infection.

For salmonella detection, genomic tool emerges as a key
The world's food supply will become safer as the food industry shifts to high-resolution, whole-genome sequencing -- which examines the full DNA of a given organism all at once.

Read More: Salmonella News and Salmonella Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.