Journal of Nuclear Medicine premiers new, full-color design

December 16, 2008

Reston, Va.--Beginning with the January 2009 issue, The Journal of Nuclear Medicine--SNM's flagship publication--will be printed in full color.

"This change to the publication allows the generous use of color for highlighting and enhancing the structure and organization of research reports," said Heinrich R. Schelbert, M.D., editor in chief of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. "Most important and critical, it strengthens the communication of research findings obtained through molecular imaging approaches."

Color has evolved as a feature that is essential to molecular imaging, as molecular imaging shows the biologic processes of disease. Molecular imaging scans "illuminate" hot spots, giving physicians critical information to appropriately diagnose and prescribe treatments, such as identifying the precise location of cancer and the extent to which cardiac disease has spread. The transition of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine to full color reflects the vital role color plays in facilitating the reading of these diagnostic imaging scans.

"The Journal of Nuclear Medicine continues to lead the way in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging," said Schelbert. "Now--published in full color--it will become an even more valuable resource for physicians, clinicians and researchers."

The change to full color comes at no cost to authors: all color renditions of images are now entirely free of charge to authors.

This important change reflects the growing esteem of this established and respected monthly publication. In its most recent impact rating, the Thompson Reuters Institute for Scientific Information's Journal Citation Report ranked The Journal of Nuclear Medicine second among 87 imaging journals worldwide. This ranking demonstrates the exceptional quality and influence of the journal as an academic and professional resource.

Additionally, open access to journal articles is now available only six months after the print edition is published. Expediting open access in order to disseminate new research has helped advance public understanding of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging and has increased sound practice throughout the medical community.

Together, these changes are expected to further advance the role of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine as a global forum for the exchange of scientific accomplishments in molecular imaging and therapy.
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About SNM--Advancing Molecular Imaging and Therapy

SNM is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about what molecular imaging is and how it can help provide patients with the best health care possible. SNM members specialize in molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated.

SNM's more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit www.snm.org.

Society of Nuclear Medicine

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