Bowman creates graphic translation of climate change data

December 16, 2009

December 15, 2009 - Signal Hill, CA - Tom Bowman, an expert in communicating scientific issues to the public and president of Bowman Global Change, has developed a series of graphics that translate key figures from the fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report for public audiences. These new graphics provide non-experts access to the authentic scientific information they need to make informed decisions about climate change risks and opportunities.

Bowman created the new format as a means to clearly and accurately communicate findings in the IPCC assessment to institutions, corporations, educators, and consumers. Interest in Bowman's innovative graphics has taken root in the scientific community - he is presenting a summary of the graphics for both the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium. His session for AGU entitled "Translating Scientific Conclusions about Risk for Public Audiences," will take place at the AGU annual meeting in San Francisco, CA on December 16, 2009. The AGU annual meeting, the nation's largest scientific meeting for earth and space sciences, will draw 16,000 geophysicists from around the world and include scientific papers on climate change, geosciences, and planetary physics.

Bowman also introduced the graphics to a national audience of aquarium science interpreters during a December 3rd webinar organized by the Monterey Bay Aquarium and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "Copenhagen: An Insider's View," was jointly conducted with Dr. Richard Somerville, distinguished Professor Emeritus at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and a coordinating lead author on the IPCC's Nobel Prize-winning report in 2007. The webinar also provided background on the history of international climate agreements and discussed the key scientific findings since 2007 and the policy issues facing participants in the current UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen.

"Tom Bowman's clear articulation of complex scientific and political processes, will help aquarium interpreters tackle this important topic with our visitors," says Cynthia Vernon, vice president of education, guest and research programs at Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Dr. Somerville described the IPCC's reports as "ore to be mined" for critical information. Bowman says that his new format is a step forward in that process, as it clarifies scientific information that had previously been inaccessible to the public. "Scientific writing and graphic conventions are poorly suited for communicating with non-scientists." says Bowman. Bowman authored a paper for the International Journal of Sustainability Communication "A Turning Point in Climate Change Communication Priorities," which urges communicators and science educators to focus on specific information about climate risks that surveys indicate the public does not know. Helping the public understand climate change in terms of managing risks is, perhaps, the climate communication community's most urgent priority.
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Bowman Global Change helps organizations make sustainable transformations. Combining the expertise of renowned scientists, behavioral scientists, and business and government leaders, Bowman Global Change facilitates transitions through education, analysis, planning, communication, and consulting projects. The company is lead by Tom Bowman, an expert in green business, who has contributed his expertise to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Public Health Association and numerous exhibit industry groups. Bowman contributes a monthly "Ask Mr. Green" column to EXHIBITOR Online. Contact Bowman Global Change at 562.494.3400 or at bowmanglobalchange.com.

Bowman Global Change

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