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This week from AGU: Icequakes, the Arctic, origins of life, ocean drilling, & 3 new papers

December 16, 2015

GeoSpace

One Million Icequakes

Nestled in the Arctic is a glacier like no other. This glacier quakes once a minute creating seismic events that rattle the earth--more frequently than scientists have ever seen. Understanding why these icequakes are so common may help researchers predict future ice flow, a process that propels climate-driven sea level rise.

Restoring white Arctic will fall to future generations who never knew it

Scientists and policymakers have discussed for decades how to slow the rate of global warming and melting Arctic ice--most recently at the Paris talks--but few have discussed how to restore the ice after it is lost. That task will likely fall to future generations who not only grew up without a white Arctic but may have conflicting interests in keeping it blue, according to an analysis presented on Monday by scientists at the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

Cold reaction has hot implications for evolution of life

When carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas mingle deep underground, they transform into methane and water--the building blocks of life. Scientists once thought the reaction, called Sabatier synthesis, could only proceed above 150 degrees Celsius. Life, they thought, was conceived deep in the scalding vents of an ancient ocean. But the Sabatier process also runs cooler, finds a new study presented at the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

Eos.org

Scientific ocean drilling charts a new course

The International Ocean Discovery Program plans drilling expeditions for 2016 and 2017 while increasing efficiencies in ship scheduling and operations.

New research papers

High-resolution Probing of Inner Core Structure with Seismic Interferometry, Geophysical Research Letters

Air moisture control on ocean surface temperature, hidden key to the warm bias enigma, Geophysical Research Letters

Intra-annual variability of biogeochemical processes in the continental shelf waters of southeastern Arabian Sea, Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
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Related Glacier Articles:

Glaciers rapidly shrinking and disappearing: 50 years of glacier change in Montana
The warming climate has dramatically reduced the size of 39 glaciers in Montana since 1966, some by as much as 85 percent, according to data released by the U.S.
Glacier shape influences susceptibility to thinning
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have identified glaciers in West Greenland that are most susceptible to thinning in the coming decades by analyzing how they're shaped.
Glacier shape influences susceptibility to melting
Just how prone a glacier is to thinning depends on its thickness and surface slope, features that are influenced by the landscape under the glacier.
Retreating Yukon glacier caused a river to disappear
A postmortem of the first known case of 'river piracy' in modern times outlines how a retreating glacier in the Yukon diverted water from one river to another, leading to many downstream effects.
UD scientists report ocean data from under Greenland's Petermann Glacier
Based on data from the first UD ocean sensors deployed under Greenland's Petermann Glacier, UD researchers report that the floating ice shelf is strongly coupled, or tied, to the ocean below and to the adjacent Nares Strait.
Hidden lakes drain below West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier
Drainage of four interconnected lakes below Thwaites Glacier in late 2013 caused only a 10 percent increase in the glacier's speed.
Thinning and retreat of West Antarctic glacier began in 1940s
New research by an international team shows that the present thinning and retreat of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica is part of a climatically forced trend that was triggered in the 1940s.
New study reveals when West Antarctica's largest glacier started retreating
Reporting this week in the journal Nature an international team led by British Antarctic Survey explains that present-day thinning and retreat of Pine Island Glacier, one of the largest and fastest shrinking glaciers of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is part of a climate trend that was already underway as early as the 1940s.
UCI and NASA document accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica
Two new studies by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA have found the fastest ongoing rates of glacier retreat ever observed in West Antarctica and offer an unprecedented look at ice melting on the floating undersides of glaciers.
UCI and NASA document accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory use satellite data to measure the alarming rate at which three massive glaciers in West Antarctica are retreating.

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