AMP issues joint guideline to standardize interpretation and reporting of sequence variants in cancer

December 16, 2016

BETHESDA, MD. -- December 16, 2016 -- The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, non-profit molecular diagnostics professional society, today published guideline recommendations for both clinical laboratory professionals and oncologists that assess the status of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based cancer tests and establish standardized classification, annotation, interpretation, and reporting conventions for somatic sequence variants. The new guideline was developed by a Working Group comprised of representatives from major professional associations whose members provide professional testing and treatment services to cancer patients.

The guideline, "Standards and Guidelines for the Interpretation and Reporting of Sequence Variants in Cancer: A Joint Consensus Recommendation of the Association for Molecular Pathology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and College of American Pathologists" was released online ahead of publication in the January issue of The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

"Cancer genomics is a rapidly evolving field, so the clinical significance of any variant in therapy, diagnosis, or prognosis should be reevaluated on an ongoing basis by all of the key stakeholders," said Marina N. Nikiforova, MD, Professor of Pathology at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Working Group member, and 2016 AMP Clinical Practice Committee Chair. "These new recommendations resulted from the successful ACMG, AMP, and CAP efforts on germline variant interpretation and were additionally informed by the diverse perspectives expressed at the ASCO, AMP, and CAP Genomic Roundtable stakeholder discussions."

The increasing use of NGS technologies has raised new challenges, especially regarding how cancer-associated sequence variants are interpreted and how molecular results are reported by different clinical laboratories. To help standardize this process, AMP convened a panel of experts to develop a new set of guidelines based on evidence from a comprehensive review of published literature, empirical data, current laboratory practice surveys, feedback from multiple public meetings, and their own professional experiences. The report proposed a four-tiered system to categorize somatic sequence variations based on their clinical significance in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and/or therapeutics:"This joint consensus recommendation represents a significant step forward in this era of precision medicine and our fight against cancer," said Marilyn M. Li, MD, Vice Chief of the Division of Genomic Diagnostics and Director of Cancer Genomic Diagnostics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, AMP Member, and Chair of the multidisciplinary Working Group. "We worked diligently to ensure the cancer genomics community was well represented and it is our hope that we will soon see the widespread adoption of these guidelines leading to improved communication between molecular pathologists, oncologists, pathologists, and most importantly, patients."
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To read the full manuscript, please visit: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmoldx.2016.10.002.

ABOUT AMP

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) was founded in 1995 to provide structure and leadership to the emerging field of molecular diagnostics. AMP's 2,300+ members practice in the various disciplines of molecular diagnostics, including bioinformatics, infectious diseases, inherited conditions and oncology. They include individuals from academic and community medical centers, government, and industry; including pathologist and doctoral scientist laboratory directors; basic and translational scientists; technologists; and trainees. Through the efforts of its Board of Directors, Committees, Working Groups, and members, AMP is the primary resource for expertise, education, and collaboration in one of the fastest growing fields in healthcare. AMP members influence policy and regulation on the national and international levels, ultimately serving to advance innovation in the field and protect patient access to high quality, appropriate testing. For more information, visit http://www.amp.org.

Association for Molecular Pathology

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