Four teams awarded inaugural translational cancer research grants

December 17, 2004

PHILADELPHIA - The American Association for Cancer Research, in alliance with The V Foundation for Cancer Research, has announced the first-ever recipients of The V Foundation-AACR Grants in Translational Cancer Research.

Four teams of cancer researchers - two from Virginia and one each from Ohio and Massachusetts - are receiving combined support from both organizations and their funding partners. These Grants bring together some of the best scientists and physicians in the U.S. to accelerate progress against this dreaded disease. The teams led by cancer researchers Theresa A. Guise, M.D. (University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Va.), Mark R. Parthun, Ph.D. (The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio), Peter O'Connell, Ph.D. (Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Va.) and Jeffrey E. Settleman, Ph.D. (Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Mass.) will each receive $600,000 for their research projects over the next three years.

"We are extremely pleased to partner with The V Foundation and others to fund these projects in translational research," said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), Chief Executive Officer with the AACR.

"Supporting translational research which benefits patients is fundamental to the mission of the AACR, and these grants are an integral part of that effort."

Added Nick Valvano, Chief Executive Officer of The V Foundation: "We are excited that in our first collaborative effort with the AACR, we are able to fund such talented scientists and clinicians."

Translational research is a two-way bridge that conveys new ideas and discoveries between the laboratory and the clinic. In this manner, advances in such areas as molecular genetics, regulatory proteins and cellular signaling can be applied to new diagnostic technologies and targeted treatments to help the cancer patients.

The V Foundation-AACR Grants in Translational Cancer Research offer awards to top doctors and scientists at National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers, prominent universities and freestanding research institutions. Proposals that hold outstanding promise for translating basic cancer findings into a new preventive strategy or therapeutic application for cancer, including improved survival and/or quality of life, were selected for the grants.

The recipient grants of $300,000 over three years are matched by the institutions from all available sources, creating a total project commitment of $600,000 for each award.

A project team must have a minimum of two scientists from the same facility and the team must possess basic and clinical research expertise. Winners are selected by a competitive process managed by a combined V Foundation-AACR Scientific Review Committee.

The Cardinal Health Foundation of Dublin, Ohio, and Abbott of Abbott Park, Ill. are helping to fund the new collaboration between AACR and The V Foundation. The Cardinal Health Foundation, which is supported by the resources of Cardinal Health, a major provider of products, services and technologies to the health care industry, has made the lead donation of $150,000. Abbott, a longtime sponsor of AACR's meetings and scientific conference, will also join this partnership for translational research.

Commenting on this new funding partnership, Debra Dendahl Hadley, Executive Director of the Cardinal Health Foundation, said, "We are very pleased to support AACR in this important investment to further research for the prevention and treatment of cancer."
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Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research is a professional society of more than 24,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical scientists engaged in all areas of cancer research in the United States and in more than 60 other countries. AACR's mission is to accelerate the prevention and cure of cancer through research, education, communication, and advocacy. Its principal activities include the publication of five major peer-reviewed scientific journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. AACR's Annual Meetings attract more than 15,000 participants who share new and significant discoveries in the cancer field. Specialty meetings, held throughout the year, focus on the latest developments in all areas of cancer research.

The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and the late Jim Valvano, legendary NC State basketball coach and ESPN commentator. Since 1993 The Foundation has raised more than $40 million used to fund cancer research grants nationwide. The Foundation awards grants through a competitive awards process strictly supervised by a Scientific Review Committee of top doctor/scientists nationwide. The Foundation operates with a small staff, a nationwide volunteer network and an all-volunteer Board of Directors and Scientific Review Committee, assuring that over the past five years, an average of 83 cents of every dollar raised has been available to fund cancer research. For more information visit The V Foundation for Cancer Research website at www.jimmyv.org.

Contact: The American Association for Cancer Research: Warren R. Froelich (215-440-9300), froelich@aacr.org
The V Foundation for Cancer Research: Melanie McCullough (919-380-9505), mmccullough@jimmyv.org
The Cardinal Health Foundation: Debra D. Hadley (debra.hadley@cardinal.com). For more information visit the Cardinal Health website at www.cardinal.com.

American Association for Cancer Research

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