Stakeholders and public should use 20 specific health indicators

December 17, 2008

WASHINGTON -- Policymakers, the media, and the public should focus on 20 specific health indicators as "yardsticks" to measure the overall health and well-being of Americans, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. By providing information that can be compared over time, these 20 indicators will also help Americans track the nation's progress on improving our health and the effectiveness of public health and care systems, the report says.

The indictors are intended for the health section of a new Web site that the nonprofit State of the USA Inc. (SUSA) is building as a tool for measuring and monitoring the nation on several fronts. The site will aim to help people become more-informed and active participants in national discussions about important topics -- such as health, education, and the environment -- by giving them a way to measure national progress from year to year and to compare it to that of other countries. Until recently, only researchers and academics have had the capacity for this kind of analysis.

The 20 proposed indicators together provide a broad picture of Americans' health and the nation's health systems. They reflect a range of factors that determine well-being, including how many individuals engage in certain risky or healthy behaviors, how well patients fare from the care they receive, and to what extent health professionals and facilities are meeting specific goals.

SUSA asked IOM to recommend no more than 20 indicators of health, each with a substantial body of high-quality data behind it. Reputable organizations are generating new data on each of these markers annually, providing a reliable means to track changes over time. The data can be sorted by population subgroups or geographic region, allowing detailed analyses and comparisons. For example, one could use the data to compare current rates of obesity in different race and ethnic groups or to track whether the national obesity rate goes up or down over the next five years.

Social and environmental factors -- such as income, race and ethnicity, education level, and pollution -- also influence people's health, noted the committee that wrote the report. The SUSA Web site will have sections devoted to education and the environment as well as other topics. Given the interconnectedness of health and these other areas, the committee urged SUSA to create links between the different sections that will enable visitors to see and explore these relationships.

"This report takes an important step of capturing the health of the American people with a few key indicators," said committee chair George J. Isham, medical director and chief health officer, HealthPartners Inc., Bloomington, Minn. "Given the gap between the relatively low performance and high costs of our health care system, data that is readily accessible on the Internet will be of great value in devising strategies to close this gap. We believe this set of measures, as deployed by the State of the USA project, can help move the nation toward better health."

IOM's Proposed Health Indicators

Health OutcomesHealth-Related BehaviorsHealth Systems
-end-
The study was sponsored by State of the USA Inc., the F.B. Heron Foundation, and William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine provides independent, objective, evidence-based advice to policymakers, health professionals, the private sector, and the public. The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council make up the National Academies. A committee roster follows.

_ Copies of State of the USA Health Indicators are available from the National Academies Press; tel. 202-334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242 or on the Internet at http://www.nap.edu. Reporters may obtain a copy from the Office of News and Public Information (contacts listed above).

[ This news release and report are available at http://national-academies.org ]

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice

COMMITTEE ON THE STATE OF THE USA HEALTH INDICATORS

GEORGE J. ISHAM, M.D., M.S. (CHAIR)
Medical Director and Chief Health Officer
Health Partners Inc.
Bloomington, Minn.

RON BIALEK, M.P.P.
President
Public Health Foundation
Washington, D.C.

NORMAN M. BRADBURN, PH.D.
Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus; and
Senior Fellow
National Opinion Research Center
University of Chicago
Chicago

CAROLINE FICHTENBERG, PH.D.
Chief Epidemiologist
Baltimore City Health Department
Baltimore

JESSIE GRUMAN, PH.D.
Executive Director
Center for the Advancement of Health
Washington, D.C.

DAVID HOLTGRAVE, PH.D.
Professor and Chair
Department of Health, Behavior, and Society
Bloomberg School of Public Health
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore

CARA V. JAMES, PH.D.
Senior Policy Analyst
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
Washington, D.C.

DAVID A. KINDIG, M.D., PH.D.
Professor Emeritus of Population Health Sciences, and
Emeritus Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences
School of Medicine
University of Wisconsin
Madison

LISA LANG, M.P.P.
Head
National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology, and
Assistant Director
Health Services Research Information
National Library of Medicine
Bethesda, Md.

DAVID R. NERENZ, PH.D.
Director of Outcomes Research
Neuroscience Institute, and
Director
Center for Health Services Research
Henry Ford Health System
Detroit

JAMES D. RESCHOVSKY, PH.D.
Senior Health Researcher
Center for Studying Health System Change
Washington, D.C.

STEVEN M. TEUTSCH, M.D., PH.D.
Executive Director
U.S. Outcomes Research
Merck and Co. Inc.
West Point, Pa.

DAVID R. WILLIAMS, PH.D., M.P.H.
Florence & Laura Norman Professor of Public Health, and
Professor of African and African American Studies and of Sociology
Department of Society, Human Development, and Health
School of Public Health
Harvard University
Boston

ALAN M. ZASLAVSKY, PH.D.
Professor of Statistics
Department of Health Care Policy
Harvard Medical School
Boston

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE STAFF

LYLA HERNANDEZ, M.P.H.
Study Director

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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