Northwestern Memorial maintains top status in nursing hospital renewed for Nurse Magnet®

December 17, 2010

CHICAGO - Northwestern Memorial Hospital, long recognized for its high standards in nursing quality, today announced the renewal of its Magnet status, the gold standard for nursing excellence. The honor is determined by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and recognizes an organizational commitment to the best in patient care. The ANCC notified Northwestern Memorial of the decision Tuesday, Dec. 14.

"Magnet status sets our hospital apart and places us amongst a very small group of institutions with top-tier standards for nursing," said Michelle Janney, RN, PhD, NEA-BC, senior vice president and Wood-Prince Family chief nurse executive at Northwestern Memorial. "We have a wonderful team of nursing staff and nursing leadership who collectively are responsible for the achievement of this great honor. Ensuring the very best standards in patient care is integral to our shared Northwestern MedicineTM vision and Magnet is a big part of our commitment to be the destination of choice for quality healthcare."

Northwestern Memorial first achieved the four-year Magnet status in 2006 through a rigorous application and review process. In 2010, Northwestern Memorial applied for and was granted re-designation as a Magnet hospital by the ANCC following a five-day site survey and comprehensive follow-up analysis. Approximately 6 percent of the nation's hospitals and healthcare organizations have been recognized with Magnet status and only 3 percent are renewed.

Research demonstrates that patients largely benefit from visiting a hospital with Magnet status. Magnet hospitals report fewer patient falls, less medication error, lower mortality and higher patient and family satisfaction. Magnet hospitals also tend to have lower nursing turnover and an improved nurse work environment. "This is an honor that builds on our Patients First mission and recognizes the exceptional work being done every day by our nurses as well as the caregivers, physicians and employees who distinguish our hospital as one of the leading teaching hospitals in the nation," added Janney.

Hundreds of employees throughout the organization contributed time and effort to the Magnet application and review process, which culminated with the ANCC's site visit in November.

The Magnet Recognition Program® was established in 1993 to recognize healthcare organizations that exhibit excellence in nursing, and measures such things as quality of nursing leadership, nurse and physician relationships, quality improvement and opportunities for professional development.
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About Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare is the parent corporation of Chicago's Northwestern Memorial Hospital, an 854-bed academic medical center hospital and Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital, a 215-bed community hospital located in Lake Forest, Illinois.

About Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Northwestern Memorial is one of the country's premier academic medical center hospitals and is the primary teaching hospital of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Along with its Prentice Women's Hospital and Stone Institute of Psychiatry, the hospital comprises 854 beds, 1,603 affiliated physicians and 7,144 employees. Northwestern Memorial is recognized for providing exemplary patient care and state-of-the art advancements in the areas of cardiovascular care; women's health; oncology; neurology and neurosurgery; solid organ and soft tissue transplants and orthopaedics.

Northwestern Memorial possesses nursing Magnet Status, the nation's highest recognition for patient care and nursing excellence, and it is listed in 12 clinical specialties in U.S. News & World Report's 2010 "America's Best Hospitals" guide. For 10 years running, it has been rated among the "100 Best Companies for Working Mothers" guide by Working Mother magazine. The hospital is a recipient of the prestigious National Quality Health Care Award and has been chosen by Chicagoans as the Consumer Choice according to the National Research Corporation's annual survey for 11 years.

Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

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