Some like it hot: Simulating single particle excitations

December 17, 2015

Plasmons, which may be thought of as clouds of electrons that oscillate within a metal nanocluster, could serve as antennae to absorb sunlight more efficiently than semiconductors. Understanding and manipulating them is important for their potential use in photovoltaics, solar cell water splitting, and sunlight-induced fuel production from CO2.

But in these applications, single particle excitation rather than the collective plasmon excitation is needed to transfer electrons one at a time to an electrode and induce desired chemical reactions. After the plasmon is excited by sunlight, it induces the single particle excitation 'hot carriers.' Now, for the first time, the interplay between the plasmon mode and the single particle excitation within a small metal cluster has been simulated directly.

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) used a real-time numerical algorithm, developed at Berkeley Lab in February, to study both the plasmon and hot carrier within the same framework. That is critical for understanding how long a particle stays excited, and whether there is energy backflow from hot carrier to plasmon. The new study shows the electron move-ment when it is perturbed by light.

"You need to consider how the plasmon can give its energy to single particle excitations. People have done this analytically, but they looked at the bulk-like material and treated the plasmon mode using classical de-scription," says Lin-Wang Wang, senior staff scientist at Berkeley Lab, who led this work. "We have described both the plasmon and the single particle excitation quantum mechanically, and studied nanoparticles because they are often used in actual applications. If you generate a hot carrier in such a nanosystem, it's easier to transfer to the connected electrode due to their small sizes." His calculations used light to excite Ag55, a me-tallic nanocluster with known geometry, and showed the behavior of the plasmon and the single particle exci-tation.

The study was published in a Nature Communications paper titled 'Interplay Between Plasmon and Single-particle Excitations in a Metal Nanocluster.' Jie Ma and Zhi Wang, also from Berkeley Lab, and Lin-Wang Wang are the authors.

In the simulations, metallic nanoparticle clusters clearly responded to external light, with charge 'sloshing' back and forth within the clusters. However, that movement can be caused both by a plasmon and by single particle excitations. The trick is showing which is which.

"We found a way to distinguish them by their different oscillating behaviors. Using this method, we found that if a hot carrier excitation is in tune with the plasmon oscillation, then 90% of the plasmon energy can be con-verted to the single particle energy. But if they are out of tune, the total energy will go back and forth be-tween the plasmon and the single particle exication," explains Wang.

Jie Ma, a postdoc who is the lead author of the paper, adds that "the single particle excitation is the continu-ous change of the electron occupation, but the plasmon is the oscillation of the electron occupations around the Fermi energy ['ground' level of the electron reservoir]." When resonance builds up between the two, most of the energy transfers to the hot carrier.

Conventional ground state computational methods cannot be used to study systems in which electrons have been excited. But using real-time simulations, an excited system can be modeled with time-dependent equa-tions that describe the movement of electrons in the femtosecond (quadrillionth of a second) timescale.

An excited single particle can drop rapidly to a lower energy state by emitting a phonon, which is the vibration of the atoms. This means that it is no longer a hot carrier. Eventually, all hot carriers will lose their energy, as electrons and holes recombine in a metallic system. But the question is how long the hot carrier will remain hot and able to transport to another electrode or molecule before it is cooled. Previous studies, which do not include the nuclei movement, cannot describe the cooling process. But Wang's simulation suggests that in a small nanostructure the carrier cools more slowly than in a bulk system.

"Here, we simulated isolated nanoparticles. But if you put the nanoparticles on some substrate, that could be really interesting," says Ma. It will be important to understand how long a hot carrier can stay hot.

With powerful computational tools, these questions can now be answered and used in the development of future plasmon-driven applications.
-end-
The work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science and supported by the Joint Center for Artificial Synthesis (JCAP), a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, and used the resources of the National Energy Re-search Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), a DOE Office of Science User Facility at Berkeley Lab.

Additional Information

For more about the research of Lin-Wang Wang go here: http://cmsn.lbl.gov

For more about JCAP go here: http://solarfuelshub.org

For more about NERSC go here: http://www.nersc.gov

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world's most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab's scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. For more, visit http://www.lbl.gov.

DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Related Nanoparticles Articles from Brightsurf:

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are promising drug delivery tools but they struggle to get past the immune system's first line of defense: proteins in the blood serum that tag potential invaders.

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles
Products derived from nanotechnology are efficient and highly sought-after, yet their effects on the environment are still poorly understood.

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour.

Nanoparticles: Acidic alert
Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized nanoparticles that can be induced by a change in pH to release a deadly dose of ionized iron within cells.

3D reconstructions of individual nanoparticles
Want to find out how to design and build materials atom by atom?

Directing nanoparticles straight to tumors
Modern anticancer therapies aim to attack tumor cells while sparing healthy tissue.

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy.

A megalibrary of nanoparticles
Using straightforward chemistry and a mix-and-match, modular strategy, researchers have developed a simple approach that could produce over 65,000 different types of complex nanoparticles.

Dialing up the heat on nanoparticles
Rapid progress in the field of metallic nanotechnology is sparking a science revolution that is likely to impact all areas of society, according to professor of physics Ventsislav Valev and his team at the University of Bath in the UK.

Illuminating the world of nanoparticles
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a light-based device that can act as a biosensor, detecting biological substances in materials; for example, harmful pathogens in food samples.

Read More: Nanoparticles News and Nanoparticles Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.