Digital wood produced with 3D printing

December 17, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, December 17, 2018--Researchers at Columbia University used a technique with voxel printing to create digital wood - a highly complex material for 3DP printing because of its combination of internal grains and external color textures. The technique is described in an article published in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing website through January 17, 2019.

In "Digital Wood: 3D Internal Color Texture Mapping," coauthors Fabian Stute, Joni Mici, Lewis Chamberlain, and Hod Lipson, Columbia University, New York, NY describe the inability to copy 3D objects with complex internal textures as a gap in the current 3D printing field. The researchers used destructive tomographic imaging to obtain images of a wood sample at very thin images and then feed the stack of images to a voxel-capable 3D printer. The authors also discuss less invasive and destructive methods that can be used to image the interior of materials with complex internal textures.
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About the Journal

3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing is the only peer-reviewed journal focused on the rapidly moving field of 3D printing and related technologies. Led by Editor-in-Chief Skylar Tibbits Director, Self-Assembly Lab, MIT, and Founder & Principal, SJET LLC., the Journal explores emerging challenges and opportunities ranging from new developments of processes and materials, to new simulation and design tools, and informative applications and case studies. Published quarterly online with open access options and in print, the Journal spans a broad array of disciplines to address the challenges and discover new breakthroughs and trends within this groundbreaking technology. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative medical and biomedical peer-reviewed journals, including Big Data, Soft Robotics, New Space, and Tissue Engineering. Its biotechnology trade magazine GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News) was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, newsmagazines, and books is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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