Study investigates cannabis use among university students

December 18, 2007

Gold Coast, Australia - December 18, 2007 - New information published in the Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research explores University students' motivations for using or not using cannabis and found various factors that might encourage use.

Researchers at Griffith University in Australia administered a survey to students aged 17 to 29 asking about their beliefs about the advantages and disadvantages of using cannabis, their perceptions of what others think they should do in relation to cannabis use, and reasons that might cause them to use or not use. Two weeks later, they completed a follow-up survey asking about their actual behavior over the previous two weeks.

Compared to non-users, users believed more strongly that cannabis would help them fit in with their friends, feel relaxed, forget their worries, and enjoy themselves. They also believed that their friends would approve of their use.

Additionally, users believed that certain factors including force of habit, wanting to relax, feeling stressed, and being around other people using cannabis would encourage them to use, while non-users rated work and study as strong reasons for not using cannabis.

"Findings from this study provide a better understanding of the different motivations of users and non-users of cannabis," the authors note. "They also open up opportunities for targeting these differences when further developing initiatives in prevention and intervention in order to enhance the educational experience of young adults."
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This study is published in the Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact journalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

To view the abstract for this article, please click here.

Dr Frances O'Callaghan MAPS, MCHP is affiliated with the Faculty of Health, School of Psychology at Griffith University in Australia and can be reached for questions at f.ocallaghan@griffith.edu.au.

The Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, launched in 1993, aims to disseminate findings of behavioral science research which have applications to current problems of society. By publishing relevant research and emphasizing the excellence of experimental design, as well as potential applicability of experimental results, the journal intends to bridge the theoretical and applied areas of biobehavioral research.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or http://interscience.wiley.com .

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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