Boston University Medical Center nephrologist named one of America's top doctors

December 18, 2008

(Boston) - Newton resident David Salant, MD, chief of Renal Medicine and director of the Nephrology Training Program at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) was recently named one of America's Top Doctors by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.

The America's Top Doctors guide, recognized by consumers seeking high-quality medical care, is a trusted and authoritative resource for identifying top doctors in the United States. The selected top doctors are nominated by hospital presidents; vice presidents of medical affairs; and chiefs of service in anesthesiology, obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, emergency medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology and surgery; as well as randomly selected board-certified physicians.

Salant is a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand Medical School in Johannesburg, South Africa. His clinical training was completed at the Johannesburg General Hospital where he was also on the faculty of the renal unit. He received research training at Boston University Medical Center and joined the faculty in 1979.

Salant is an expert on the care and treatment of patients suffering from autoimmune diseases that affect the kidneys and other organs, such as lupus and vasculitis. Supported by grants from the NIH, he has conducted extensive research on the effects of immune disorders on the kidneys, and he has authored over 100 scientific publications and book chapters.

Salant has received several awards and honors, including an Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association, and election to the American Society of Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians. He has served on several National Institutes of Health advisory panels and on the editorial boards of several prominent journals. He has also played a prominent educational role nationally as a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine.
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Boston University

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