New manual presents robust, state-of-the-art proteomics methods for teaching and research

December 18, 2008

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Dec. 18, 2008) - "Life happens at the level of proteins . . . They build, process, activate, and inactivate; they polymerize, repair, support, modify, degrade, fold, migrate, and transport; they shorten, signal, cleave, inhibit, digest, fluoresce, induce, excise, carry, and repress; they bind, transfer, translocate, amplify, proofread, regulate, and perform countless more activities."

This excerpt is from the preface of the new book Proteomics: A Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Course Manual. Because proteins have such diverse responsibilities in the cell and are structurally and chemically diverse, scientists who are involved in the large-scale study of proteins require especially rigorous and reliable laboratory methods to successfully address their research questions.

Proteomics assembles cutting-edge protocols, helpful hints, and lecture notes to teach researchers from a wide variety of disciplines the essential methods of proteomics using state-of-the-art instrumentation. It is geared towards all involved in studying proteins, their interactions and characteristics in the laboratory, and can be used both as the basis for a course and as a detailed bench manual.

Its authors, Drs. Andrew J. Link and Joshua LaBaer, have co-taught a popular proteomics course at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory for the past 7 years. Most of the experiments that have been taught in this course, as well as background descriptions and lists of recommended websites and reading material, are included in this manual. Both authors are leaders in their fields and provide complementary expertise.

The protocols include a range of basic and advanced methods for protein preparation, separation, and characterization. State-of-the-art methods involving protein microarrays, liquid chromatography, high-throughput cloning of expression constructs, IMAC, mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF, and MudPIT are provided. An emphasis is placed on strategies for analyzing the data that are produced from each of the experiments.
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About the book:Proteomics: A Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Course Manual was written by Andrew J. Link (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee) and Joshua LaBaer (Harvard University School of Medicine), and published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (© 2009). It is available in paperback (ISBN 978-087969787-7) and hardcover (ISBN 978-087969793-8), and is 232 pp. in length (illus., appendices, index). For additional information about the book, please see http://www.cshlpress.com/link/proteomicsp.htm. Selected protocols from the book also available from Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (http://cshprotocols.cshlp.org/). Proteomics will be used as the textbook in future proteomics courses offered by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; information about the next proteomics course at CSHL is at http://meetings.cshl.edu/courses/c-proteo09.shtml.

About the authors: Dr. Andrew J. Link is Associate Professor of Microbiology & Immunology and Biochemistry at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Joshua LaBaer is a founder and Director of the Institute for Proteomics at Harvard Medical School, an associate editor of the Journal of Proteome Research, a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Proteome Society, and a founding member of the Human Proteome Organization.

About Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is a private, nonprofit institution in New York that conducts research in cancer and other life sciences and has a variety of educational programs. Its Press, originating in 1933, is the largest of the Laboratory's five education divisions and is a publisher of books, journals, and electronic media for scientists, students, and the general public. For more information, visit www.cshlpress.com.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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