UC Riverside turfgrass specialist receives high honor

December 18, 2012

RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- Victor Gibeault, a cooperative extension specialist, emeritus, at the University of California, Riverside, will receive the 2013 United States Golf Association (USGA) Green Section Award.

Presented annually by the USGA to honor those persons who deserve special recognition for distinguished service to golf through their work with turfgrass, the award will be presented to Gibeault on Feb. 8, 2013, at the USGA Green Section Education Conference in San Diego, Calif.

Gibeault, 71, has been researching and educating the golf industry on turfgrass for more than 40 years.

"I am both pleased and honored to have been selected to receive the USGA Green Section Award," he said. "Now retired, I have been fortunate to spend my career as a University of California Cooperative Extension specialist, and in that role, I have worked on turfgrass research issues and educational projects and programs. My activities with the golf course industry have been enjoyable, fruitful, and have given me a sense of personal accomplishment, for which I am grateful."

Gibeault served 13 years on the USGA Turfgrass and Environmental Research Committee. As a member of the committee he played a key role in formulating its policies, establishing research priorities, analyzing proposals and monitoring the progress and results of funded projects.

He holds the U.S. patents for two zoysiagrass cultivars, De Anza and Victoria, and one buffalograss cultivar, UC Verde. Additionally he co-edited the 1985 book, Turfgrass Water Conservation.

In 2004 the board of directors of the Southern California Turfgrass Foundation presented him with the Turfgrass Hall of Fame Award. The Golf Course Superintendents Association of America awarded him its Distinguished Service Award in 1993, and he was recognized by the USGA with its Piper & Oakley Award in 1999.

Gibeault retired from UC Riverside in 2007.

The USGA Green Section is directly involved in every phase of golf course maintenance and management from the control of diseases, insects, and weeds to the breeding and release of improved strains of turfgrass. It is involved, too, in research pertaining to cultural practices, equipment development, soils, fertilizers, irrigation, and other maintenance.
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The University of California, Riverside is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment has exceeded 21,000 students. The campus will open a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.

University of California - Riverside

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