Nav: Home

Study shows risks for additional procedures after bariatric surgery

December 18, 2019

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Dec. 18, 2019 - Which of the two most common bariatric surgeries - gastric sleeve or gastric bypass - has the highest subsequent risk of additional operations or procedures?

According to a study published in the current issue of JAMA Network Open, gastric bypass surgery is associated with a slightly higher risk of returning to the operating room or having other types of interventions, such as endoscopy.

"If you're having bariatric surgery and trying to decide between a sleeve and a bypass, this may be really important to know," said Kristina H. Lewis, M.D., corresponding author of the study and assistant professor of epidemiology and prevention at Wake Forest Baptist Health.

The study used a nationwide U.S. commercial insurance claims database to study adults age 18 to 64 who underwent a first Roux-en-y gastric bypass (bypass) or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (sleeve) procedure between January 2010 and June 2017.

The research team analyzed data from 4,476 patients undergoing bypass and 8,551 patients undergoing sleeve to determine the primary outcome of any abdominal operative intervention after the initial procedure. Patients were followed for up to four years after surgery.

The team found that bypass patients were about 20% more likely to have additional operations on their abdomen than a similar group of sleeve patients. In addition, endoscopies also were more common among bypass patients. By four years out, the researchers estimated that 26.5% of bypass patients had an endoscopy procedure compared to 18% of sleeve patients.

"Although bypass surgery is more effective for weight loss and diabetes remission, patients should be aware that it may be associated with a slightly higher risk of undergoing additional procedures later," Lewis said.

"We already have strong evidence that bariatric surgery is the most effective weight loss intervention for patients with severe obesity, and surgery is definitely much safer than it used to be. But patients still have to balance the pros of having surgery against potential complications, and this may be especially important when choosing between bariatric surgery types. This decision - sleeve vs. bypass - will depend on a patient's goals for surgery and his or her particular health concerns."
-end-
Support for this study was provided by grants R01DK112750 and P30DK092924 from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Related Weight Loss Articles:

Changing weight-loss strategies, attempts
The proportion of adults who tried to lose weight in the previous year increased from 1999 to 2016 but the findings of this observational study suggest the results may have been unsatisfactory.
Quality of life changes after weight loss
Obesity increases a number of adverse health consequences including reduced health-related quality of life.
Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans.
Is the most effective weight-loss strategy really that hard?
Dietary self-monitoring is the best predictor of weight-loss success. But the practice is viewed as so unpleasant and time-consuming, many would-be weight-losers won't adopt it.
Study: Faster weight loss no better than slow weight loss for health benefits
Losing weight slowly or quickly won't tip the scale in your favor when it comes to overall health, according to new research.
Mindfulness training may help support weight loss
Mindfulness training may improve the effectiveness of intensive weight management programs, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
Does weight loss before surgery provide benefits?
For obese and overweight patients, it is common for various surgical procedures to be deferred until they have lost weight through diet and exercise.
Can community exercise prevent bone loss from weight loss in older adults?
In a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of older adults with obesity who were cutting calories, an intervention that incorporated resistance training, aerobic training, or neither did not prevent bone loss associated with active weight loss.
Daily fasting works for weight loss
A new study shows that daily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure.
Weight loss is an important predictor of cancer
Unintended weight loss is the second highest risk factor for some forms of cancer, concludes the first robust research analysis to examine the association.
More Weight Loss News and Weight Loss Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.