Test method provides biocompatibility 'barometer'

December 19, 2003

A new method for quantitatively measuring the compatibility of materials with living tissues has been developed by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Described in a Dec. 11 presentation at the Tissue Engineering Society International's conference in Orlando, Fla., the technique should provide a more sensitive and reliable means to evaluate the biocompatibility of new materials for a wide range of applications from contact lenses to dental coatings to bone implants.

A paper outlining the new method has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.

The new method, which represents a novel application of existing bench-top scientific instruments, is a two-step process. The first step involves using a device called a polymerase chain reaction instrument to measure the levels of an organism's cytokines when exposed to a given material. Cytokines are signaling molecules released by white blood cells to protect the body from foreign materials. Higher levels of cytokine production generally indicate non-biocompatible materials have caused inflammation. The second step involves testing exposed cells for a specific protein in the cell membrane, the presence of which indicates cells are dying. This is a complementary test for more serious responses to materials because dying cells are often not capable of producing cytokines. The NIST tests were conducted on cultured mouse cells, which produce similar responses as whole tissues.

NIST post-doctoral researcher LeeAnn Bailey called the new method a "barometer" of biocompatibility.

Whereas current means to test biocompatibility produce a yes/no result that a material is minimally biocompatible or not, the new analysis can tell which materials are more biocompatible than others. Industry and researchers should be able to use this method to produce new materials for dentistry and other medical applications that are even more well matched to the human body.
-end-


National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Related Cytokines Articles from Brightsurf:

Uracil switch in SARS-CoV-2 genome alters innate immune responses
Our bodies could be inducing mutations in the COVID-19 virus that activate immune cells to increase the production of pro-inflammatory molecules.

Oncotarget: Th1 cytokines potentiate apoptosis of breast cancer cells and suppress tumor growth
Volume 11, Issue 30 of Oncotarget reported that previously, the authors showed that anti-estrogen drugs combined with a dendritic cell-based anti-HER-2 vaccine known to induce strong Th1-polarized immunity dramatically improved clinical response rates in patients with HER-2pos/ERpos early breast cancer.

A bifidobacterial protein that can reduce inflammation in COVID-19 found by a RUDN geneticist
A geneticist from RUDN University studied the effect of Bifidobacterium (intestinal bacteria) on the inflammatory process and discovered that their surface protein is capable of stopping excessive or uncontrollable inflammation, like the one observed in COVID-19 patients.

Does the COVID-19 cytokine storm exist?
Cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this immune response is too strong, also known as ''cytokine storm'', it can cause harm to the patient.

St18 is a negative regulator of VEGF
A research team led by Kenta Maruyama M.D., Ph.D. from National Institute for Physiological Sciences explored the role of St18 in the regulation of VEGF expression.

Cytokine implicated in HLH treatment resistance
Research sheds light on cytokine storm syndromes and how ruxolitinib may benefit patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

Proteins may halt the severe cytokine storms seen in COVID-19 patients
A team of MIT researchers has developed specialized antibody-like receptor proteins that they believe could soak up the excess cytokines produced during a cytokine storm.

Cancer: The immune system attacks tumors remotely
How does the immune system act to limit tumor development?

Scientists discover how rogue communications between cells lead to leukemia
New research has deciphered how rogue communications in blood stem cells can cause leukemia.

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant...
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system.

Read More: Cytokines News and Cytokines Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.