Global collaborative efforts help delineate pediatric TBI in China

December 19, 2012

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among children in China are a growing public health concern. Two new studies by researchers of the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Wuhan Children's Hospital in China examined pediatric TBIs that were treated at Wuhan Children's Hospital from 2002 to 2011.

The first study, appearing in the December 2012 print issue of PLOS ONE, investigated the causes, characteristics and trends of pediatric TBIs in China and found that falls, struck by/against objects and traffic collisions were the top external causes of TBI. The study also found that approximately six percent of all TBIs among children under two years of age were caused by suspected child abuse. This is the first study to highlight the important role of suspected child abuse in causing TBIs among infants in China and has led to the second study appearing in the November 2012 issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, which examined abuse-related TBIs among children in China. These two publications are not only the first steps in understanding the causes of traumatic brain injury among children in China but a way to highlight the success of global collaborations in injury research.

Since its inception in 2004, the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy has established several international collaborations, including the one with Wuhan Children's Hospital, and has worked to decrease the burden of injury morbidity and mortality worldwide. "The successful collaboration with Wuhan Children's Hospital is a testament to their leaders' dedication and commitment to promoting academic excellence and innovation in clinical care," said Huiyun Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD and Director for International Programs at the Center for Injury Research and Policy. "Globalization brings many challenges, as well as great opportunities, and we are excited about our collaboration with Wuhan Children's Hospital," said Dr. Xiang, also an Associate Professor of the Division of Epidemiology at The Ohio State University College of Public Health.

"In the past five years, a total of seven physicians from Wuhan Children's Hospital received clinical training at Nationwide Children's Hospital. These physicians have become a driving force for innovative care and academic excellence at Wuhan Children's Hospital," said Jianbo Shao, MD, Vice-President for Research and Training at Wuhan Children's Hospital. "We cherish the relationship with Nationwide Children's Hospital and look forward to more collaboration in scientific research and clinical training between the two organizations."
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The studies are both available online. "Characteristics and Trends of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries Treated at a Large Pediatric Medical Center in China 2002-2011" is available on the PLOS ONE website by visiting at http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0051634. "Characteristics and Trends of Hospitalized Pediatric Abuse Head Trauma in Wuhan, China: 2002-2011"is available through the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health's website at http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/9/11/4187.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital works globally to reduce injury-related pediatric death and disabilities. With innovative research as its core, CIRP works to continually improve the scientific understanding of the epidemiology, biomechanics, prevention, acute treatment and rehabilitation of injuries. CIRP serves as a pioneer by translating cutting edge injury research into education, policy and advances in clinical care. For related injury prevention materials or to learn more about CIRP visit http://www.injurycenter.org.

For more information on the Center for Injury Research and Policy, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/injury-research-and-policy

For more information on The Research Institute, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/pediatric-research

For more information on Dr. Xiang, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/huiyun-xiang

Nationwide Children's Hospital

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