TGen attracts Dallas partner in Translational Drug Development

December 19, 2013

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., and DALLAS, Texas -- Dec. 19, 2013 -- ORIX USA Health and Life Sciences has completed an investment into Translational Drug Development (TD2) through the purchase of equity from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

TGen will remain a significant minority equity holder in TD2, which has been a for-profit subsidiary of the non-profit TGen.

ORIX USA, a Dallas-based diversified financial conglomerate with nearly $ 5 billion in assets and $30 billion of assets under management, will provide the capital needed to enable TD2 to expand its capabilities to assist pharmaceutical companies in the development of new drugs based on the specific molecular profile of individual cancer patients.

"The investment from ORIX USA into TD2 speaks to the value-creation that TGen brings to Arizona, and in this case specifically to Scottsdale," said Tess Burleson, TGen Chief Operating Officer and President of TGen Accelerators. "This transaction showcases TGen's strength in bringing bioscience investment dollars from out-of-state to Arizona."

Dr. Jeffery Trent, TGen President and Research Director; Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, TGen Physician In Chief; and former TGen executive Richard Love, founded TD2 in 2003 to accelerate cancer research and rare disease drug development for global pharmaceutical and leading academic institutions.

Under the leadership of President and CEO Dr. Stephen Gately, TD2 has managed and designed hundreds of preclinical and clinical engagements that have measurably improved the drug discovery process in one of humans' most complex disease areas, cancer. TD2's unique approach to patient identification, high throughput computational chemistry, and advanced genomic and diagnostic data analysis, gives the company a distinct and sustainable scientific advantage towards accelerate drug discovery in the fields of oncology and rare disease.

ORIX USA and TD2 will establish a unique and capital-efficient drug development model that leverages TD2's broad capabilities and oncology expertise with ORIX's international financial and operational resources.

Dr. Gately and existing management will continue to lead the company at their headquarters on the Mayo Clinic campus in Scottsdale.

"TD2 is excited to partner with ORIX USA Health and Life Sciences because of their knowledge and expertise in growing life science companies," Dr. Gately said. "Working together we will focus on the rapid development of effective new medicines for patients with cancer."

John Amos, CEO of ORIX USA Health and Life Sciences said, "ORIX is excited and privileged to work with the world-class scientists at TD2 and TGen. I have looked for a TD2-like company that combines scientific expertise and a focus on capital efficient drug discovery for the better part of a decade. We are thankful that TGen and TD2 have selected ORIX as their capital and development partner for their next phase of growth."

An independent assessment of TD2's economic impact performed by Pittsburgh-based Tripp Umbach predicted that by 2015 TD2 and its affiliations would have a total annual economic impact of $239 million, generating 1,080 jobs and producing $6.6 million annually in direct and indirect tax revenues for the City of Scottsdale.

Gov. Jan Brewer hailed the TGen-ORIX USA partnership as a key example of the benefits of supporting Arizona bioscience.

"This partnership shows that we can grow and diversify the Arizona economy in ways that will pay dividends in expanded jobs and revenues now, and exponentially in the future," Gov. Brewer said.

Dr. Trent said the growth and expansion possibilities brought about by ORIX USA will over the long-term add to TD2's value and provide great potential for creating clinical benefit.

"There is a high demand for TD2's integrated suite of tools that inform clinical development plans," Dr. Trent said. "By aligning with ORIX, we can move more rapidly in expanding our reach, which has the potential for bringing increased benefit to patients in need of ground-breaking therapies."
-end-
About TGen

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: http://www.tgen.org.

About TD2

Translational Drug Development (TD2) is an oncology development organization that provides innovative services for oncology-focused biopharmaceutical companies. Using a dedicated team of professionals with broad experience and understanding in drug development, TD2 is uniquely positioned to support improved and accelerated development of medicines for life-threatening diseases. TD2 applies rigorous and high-throughput translational preclinical development, combined with regulatory affairs expertise, to customize clinical trial design and execution. TD2's suite of capabilities encourages the timely selection of patient populations most likely to benefit from a new agent, and the rapid identification of clinically significant endpoints. TD2 is committed to reducing the risks and uncertainty inherent in the drug development process and to the acceleration of patient access to promising treatments. For more information, visit: http://www.td2inc.com.

Press Contact:

Steve Yozwiak
TGen Senior Science Writer
602-343-8704
syozwiak@tgen.org

The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.