Nav: Home

Radiologists positioned to detect elder abuse but additional training and research needed

December 19, 2016

Leesburg, VA, Dec. 19, 2016 -- Radiologists may be uniquely positioned to identify elder abuse, but they don't have training or experience in detecting it, according to a study published in the December 2016 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (>AJR). As many as 10% of older U.S. adults experience elder mistreatment each year, and evidence suggests that victims have dramatically increased mortality and morbidity, the AJR article said.

Radiologists play a critical role in child abuse detection by identifying injury patterns that suggest intentional injury rather than an accident. Though a potential opportunity exists to make a similar contribution in elder abuse, it has not yet been a focus of radiology research, training, or practice.

Of the 19 diagnostic radiologists interviewed as part of this research, only two reported formal or informal training in elder abuse detection, and all participants believed they had missed cases of elder abuse. Despite this, all diagnostic radiologists interviewed reported a desire for additional training in the subject area. The study detailing this information, titled, "Radiologists' Training, Experience, and Attitudes About Elder Abuse Detection," is available through open access on AJR's website located at http://www.ajronline.org/. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging.

Identifying elder abuse can be challenging for radiologists. "There's very little research that examines injury patterns or imaging correlates in elder abuse," said Tony Rosen, study coauthor and emergency physician at Weill Cornell Medical College, New York. "Additionally, for various reasons including age-related osteopenia, use of anticoagulant medications, and the frequency of accidental injuries from falls, elder abuse is often not easy to spot. Also, while patient age is often very helpful to radiologists assessing images for potential child abuse, it is not as useful in older adults because one 81-year-old may be running marathons while another is bed-bound in a nursing home."

Kieran Murphy, study coauthor and radiology professor at the University of Toronto, Ontario, emphasized the opportunity for radiologists to potentially contribute. "Geriatric patients, particularly those with acute injuries, commonly undergo radiographic imaging as part of their medical evaluation, so radiologists may be well-positioned to raise suspicion for mistreatment."

On the basis of these findings, the research team plans to conduct future studies to define pathognomonic injury patterns and to explore how to empower radiologists to incorporate detection into their practice. Rosen said, "Radiologists are a core part of the medical team in child abuse cases, so why shouldn't they be a core part of the team in elder abuse?"
-end-
Founded in 1900, ARRS is the first and oldest radiology society in the United States, and is an international forum for progress in radiology. The Society's mission is to improve health through a community committed to advancing knowledge and skills in radiology. ARRS achieves its mission through an annual scientific and educational meeting, publication of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) and InPractice magazine, topical symposia and webinars, and print and online educational materials. ARRS is located in Leesburg, VA.

American Roentgen Ray Society

Related Radiologists Articles:

Combination of AI & radiologists more accurately identified breast cancer
An artificial intelligence (AI) tool accurately identified breast cancer when combined with analysis by radiologists.
Diagnostic radiologists with lifetime ABR certificates less likely to participate in MOC
An ahead-of-print article from AJR discovers lifetime-certified diagnostic radiologists whose Maintenance of Certification was not mandated by the American Board of Radiology were far less likely to participate in ABR MOC programs--especially general radiologists and those working in smaller, nonacademic practices in states with lower population densities 'Many opinions have been expressed regarding MOC in radiology, but there is actually very little public data on the matter,' says Andrew Rosenkrantz, ARRS Leonard Berlin Scholar.
AJR publishes gender affirmation surgery primer for radiologists
Since gender incongruence is now categorized as a sexual health condition, an ahead-of-print article published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) contends that all subspecialties must be prepared to identify radiologic correlates and distinguish key postoperative variations in the three major categories of gender affirmation surgery: genital reconstruction, body contouring, and maxillofacial contouring.
AI tool helps radiologists detect brain aneurysms
Radiologists improved their diagnoses of brain aneurysms with the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by medical experts and computer scientists.
Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists
Artificial intelligence was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment.
Comparison between clinicians' and radiologists' understanding and imaging of breast pain
Clinicians need more education in the types of breast pain that necessitate an imaging workup and what imaging to order, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii.
AI performs as well as experienced radiologists in detecting prostate cancer
UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer.
Study finds robots can detect breast cancer as well as radiologists
A new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that artificial intelligence systems may be able to perform as accurately as radiologists in the evaluation of digital mammography in breast cancer screening.
Radiologists can help identify victims of domestic violence
Radiologists may play a crucial role in identifying signs of intimate partner violence, a type of domestic violence, according to a new study.
Emergency radiologists see inner toll of opioid use disorders
Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opioid use disorders, according to results from a 12-year study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.
More Radiologists News and Radiologists Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.