Nav: Home

Chinese scientists reveal a novel signaling pathway for chilling tolerance in rice

December 19, 2017

The ability of plants to tolerate chilling stress is fundamental in determining the growing season and geographical distribution of plants. Local temperature anomalies caused by global climate change directly threaten crop production.

Improvement of chilling tolerance in rice varieties requires clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of chilling signaling pathways.

The primary signal transduction pathway of chilling tolerance in rice has been established already, but how the diverse components are regulated is not clear.

OsbHLH002 is one of more than 100 members of the bHLH transcription factor family in rice and has the highest homology with Arabidopsis ICE1 protein, which is one of the core members in the cold signaling pathway in Arabidopsis (hence OsbHLH002 is also called OsICE1).

The research team led by Prof. CHONG Kang from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed a new mechanism for chilling tolerance mediated by OsMAPK3-OsbHLH002-OsTPP1 in rice.

The research team had shown in 2009 that overexpression of the wild rice gene OrbHLH2 enhanced tolerance to osmotic stress in Arabidopsis.

This time they discovered that the cold-activated protein kinase OsMAPK3 phosphorylates the transcription factor OsbHLH002/OsICE1 directly to enhance its transactivation activity.

Moreover, OsMAPK3 attenuated the interaction between OsbHLH002 and E3 ubiquitin ligase OsHOS1, which led to reduced ubiquitination and degradation of OsbHLH002.

The increase of the protein content and transactivation activity of OsbHLH002 effectively activates the expression of OsTPP1 (encoding trehalose-6-phosphatase) to promote the hydrolysis of trehalose-6-phosphate, increasing the trehalose content and enhancing the chilling tolerance of rice.

These results established a novel pathway OsMAPK3-OsbHLH002-OsTPP1. This pathway transduces the cold signal from the kinase cascade system to the nucleus and promotes synthesis of an osmotic protectant to regulate the chilling tolerance in rice.
-end-
This finding has been published in Developmental Cell in an article entitled "OsMAPK3 Phosphorylates OsbHLH002/OsICE1 and Inhibits Its Ubiquitination to Activate OsTPP1 and Enhances Rice Chilling Tolerance."

The study was supported by the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Related Protein Articles:

Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles.
A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle.
A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis.
Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation.
Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health.
Protein injections in medicine
One day, medical compounds could be introduced into cells with the help of bacterial toxins.
Discovery of an unusual protein
Scientists from Bremen discover an unusual protein playing a significant role in the Earth's nitrogen cycle.
Protein aggregation: Protein assemblies relevant not only for neurodegenerative disease
Amyloid fibrils play a crucial role in neurodegenerative illnesses. Scientists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have now been able to use cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to decode the spatial structure of the fibrils that are formed from PI3K SH3 domains - an important model system for research.
Old protein, new tricks: UMD connects a protein to antibody immunity for the first time
How can a protein be a major contributor in the development of birth defects, and also hold the potential to provide symptom relief from autoimmune diseases like lupus?
Infection-fighting protein also senses protein misfolding in non-infected cells
Researchers at the University of Toronto have uncovered an immune mechanism by which host cells combat bacterial infection, and at the same time found that a protein crucial to that process can sense and respond to misfolded proteins in all mammalian cells.
More Protein News and Protein Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Biology Of Sex
Original broadcast date: May 8, 2020. Many of us were taught biological sex is a question of female or male, XX or XY ... but it's far more complicated. This hour, TED speakers explore what determines our sex. Guests on the show include artist Emily Quinn, journalist Molly Webster, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi, and structural biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Wubi Effect
When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huweai and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China's technological renaissance almost didn't happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn't fit on a keyboard.  Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.