Nav: Home

New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes

December 19, 2018

A new Biological Reviews article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species.

The review article also considers how novel threats of altered fire regimes, landscape fragmentation, and invasive species result in suboptimal movements that drive populations downwards. In addition, it raises key questions that, if addressed, will help clarify the role of animal movements in affecting the long-term responses of species to fire-induced vegetation change.

"Fire shapes ecosystems around the world by incinerating plant biomass, and in doing so it shapes the availability of resources for animals; however, the way that animals are distributed in fire-prone landscapes isn't just a product of the distribution of their favored resources. We have long tried to understand why species are distributed as they are in fire-prone landscapes, but most of the current theories fall short of explaining those patterns," said lead author Dr. Dale Nimmo, of the Charles Sturt University, in Australia. "In this paper we have tried to consider the consequences of animal movement and how patterns of movement might change, and even become harmful, when habitats become fragmented, invasive species (such as novel predators) are introduced, or fire regimes change abruptly. Answering the questions we pose will require fire ecologists and movement ecologists to work together, using both established and emerging technologies to quantify animal movement in relation to fire history."
-end-


Wiley

Related Invasive Species Articles:

Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming
Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife.
Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay
A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay -- it's likely to expand its territory.
DNA tests of UK waters could help catch invasive species early
A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton have discovered several artificially introduced species in the coastal waters of southern England, using a technique that could help the early detection of non-native species if adopted more widely.
For certain invasive species, catching infestation early pays off
An international research team led by invasion ecologist Bethany Bradley at UMass Amherst has conducted the first global meta-analysis of the characteristics and size of invasive alien species' impacts on native species as invaders become more abundant.
Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species
A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study by the University of Plymouth suggests.
More Invasive Species News and Invasive Species Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...