Nav: Home

Emerging trends in advanced nano-materials based electrochemical geno-sensors

December 19, 2018

Advancement in technology is making life easier. However, innovation in nano-materials has made them important enough and now they are represented as the most promising class of new materials due to their intriguing optical, electronic and redox properties. The development of reliable synthetic procedures owed its progress to the emergence of nanotechnology and also to the wide range of applications it brought to the surface.

Nano-structured materials consist of a high surface area, biocompatibility, non-toxicity and charge-sensitive conductance. These properties are used for the development of simple, rapid, highly sensitive, inexpensive and portable electrochemical geno-sensors. This review focuses on the development and validation of nano-materials which are advanced in nature and based on electrochemical geno-sensors. Geno-sensors make use of the unique properties of nano-materials for signal transduction and the detection of chemical analytes while playing a role of an electroactive species.

As electrochemical geno-sensors that have potential to be developed as the next generation field-deployable analytical tool, this review highlights the current progress on highly sensitive and flexible nano-structured materials.
-end-
This article is Open Access. To obtain the article please visit http://www.eurekaselect.com/167220

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Development Articles:

Reconstructing the clock of human development
Researchers used iPS cells to reconstructed the human 'segmentation clock,' a key point in early embryonic development that determines how the body gets segmented.
Mother nature and child development
A world first review of the importance of nature play could transform children's play spaces, supporting investment in city and urban parks, while also delivering important opportunities for children's physical, social and emotional development.
Citizen science for sustainable development
Monitoring progress on the UN Sustainable Development Goals requires a huge amount of data.
A molecular 'atlas' of animal development
Scientists have studied the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans for decades, making essential contributions to basic science.
Novel paradigm in drug development
Targeted protein degradation (TPD) is a new paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to the development of new medicines to treat diseases such as cancer more effectively.
Turbo chip for drug development
In spite of increasing demand, the number of newly developed drugs decreased continuously in the past decades.
New knowledge on the development of asthma
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied which genes are expressed in overactive immune cells in mice with asthma-like inflammation of the airways.
Structural development of the brain
In a recent study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, researchers reveal how the basic structure of the brain is formed.
When development and conservation clash in the Serengeti
New or upgraded roads in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem around Serengeti National Park will not reduce growing pressure on the ecosystem, a study shows.
Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone
Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing Feb.
More Development News and Development Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.