Artificial skin system can heal wounds

December 20, 2007

Daegu, Korea - December 20, 2007 - A new study in Artificial Organs tested the effects of a wound dressing created with hair follicular cells. The findings reveal that skin substitutes using living hair cells can increase wound healing.

Researchers applied the technique to wound surfaces on mice. Subjects that were administered this biological dressing produced two times better wound closure than the control set.

The technique not only provides the proper environment for cell attachment and growth, but also serves as an effective biodressing to keep wounds moist and maintain structural strength during healing. "This technique shows promise as a biological dressing that is not only efficient and strong but also can be produced with less time and effort," says Jung Chul Kim, lead author of the study.

The use of skin substitutes for wound healing has suffered setbacks in recent years due to the expensive price. However, this method of wound dressing improves early-stage wound healing and reduces the time between preparation and patient use.
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This study is published in the November 2007 issue of Artificial Organs. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Dr. Jung Chul Kim is affiliated with Kyungpook National University in Daegu, Korea and can be reached for questions at jayckim@knu.ac.kr.

Since 1977, Artificial Organs has been publishing original articles featuring the studies of design, performance, and evaluation of the biomaterials and devices for the international medical, scientific, and engineering communities involved in the research and clinical application of artificial organ development.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or http://interscience.wiley.com .

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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