Nav: Home

The UN declares 2009 the International Year of Astronomy

December 20, 2007

The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) celebrates the first astronomical use of the telescope by Galileo -- a momentous event that initiated 400 years of astronomical discoveries and triggered a scientific revolution which profoundly affected our worldview. Now telescopes on the ground and in space explore the Universe, 24 hours a day, across all wavelengths of light. The President of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Catherine Cesarsky says: "The International Year of Astronomy 2009 gives all nations a chance to participate in this ongoing exciting scientific and technological revolution."

The IYA2009 will highlight global cooperation for peaceful purposes - the search for our cosmic origin and our common heritage which connect all citizens of planet Earth. For several millennia, astronomers have worked together across all boundaries including geographic, gender, age, culture and race, in line with the principles of the UN Charter. In that sense, astronomy is a classic example of how science can contribute towards furthering international cooperation.

At the IAU General Assembly on 23 July 2003 in Sydney (Australia), the IAU unanimously approved a resolution in favour of the proclamation of 2009 as the International Year of Astronomy. Based on Italy's initiative, UNESCO's General Conference at its 33rd session recommended that the UN General Assembly adopt a resolution to declare 2009 the International Year of Astronomy. On 20 December 2007 the International Year of Astronomy 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations 62nd General Assembly. The UN has designated the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as the lead agency for the IYA2009. The IAU will function as the facilitating body for IYA2009.

The IYA2009 is, first and foremost, an activity for the citizens of planet Earth. It aims to convey the excitement of personal discovery, the pleasure of sharing fundamental knowledge about the Universe and our place in it, and the merits of the scientific method. Astronomy is an invaluable source of inspiration for humankind throughout all nations. So far 99 nations and 14 organisations have signed up to participate in the IYA2009 - an unprecedented network of committed communicators and educators in astronomy.
-end-
For more information on the International Year of Astronomy 2009 please visit the website at http://www.astronomy2009.org/

International Astronomical Union

Related Astronomy Articles:

An application of astronomy to save endangered species
The world's first project that combines drone technology with astrophysics to monitor the distribution and density of animal populations to help the conservation of endangered species.
The past, present & future of gravitational-wave astronomy, with Kip Thorne & Rainer Weiss
In an interview published online this week, the winners of the 2016 Kavli Prize in Astrophysics discuss their 40-year effort to detect gravitational waves, the elusive ripples in the fabric of space-time that Albert Einstein so boldly predicted.
Astronomy shown to be set in standing stone
University of Adelaide research has for the first time statistically proven that the earliest standing stone monuments of Britain, the great circles, were constructed specifically in line with the movements of the Sun and Moon, 5000 years ago.
RIT awarded a total of $1 million from NSF for gravitational-wave astronomy
RIT won more than $1 million in federal funding to study the dynamics of extreme black holes and to develop the Einstein Toolkit, making Einstein's equations user-friendly for scientists exploring the new field of gravitational wave astronomy.
Largest crowdsource astronomy network helps confirm discovery of 'Tatooine' planet
Lehigh University astronomer assistant professor of physics Joshua Pepper is using crowdsourcing to gather observations worldwide.
ESO signs largest ever ground-based astronomy contract for E-ELT dome and structure
At a ceremony in Garching bei München, Germany, ESO signed the contract with the ACe Consortium, consisting of Astaldi, Cimolai and the nominated sub-contractor EIE Group, for the construction of the dome and telescope structure of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT).
John Beckman: 'Astronomy is a science that makes us humble'
The University of La Laguna celebrated the solemn act of investment as Doctor Honoris Causa of the astrophysicist John Beckman, Emeritus Research Professor of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas and of the Astrophysics Department of the University of La Laguna, as well as researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.
Launch of Astrosat first Indian astronomy satellite
The first Indian astronomy satellite Astrosat, was launched on Sept.
IAU signs agreements for 5 new coordinating offices of astronomy for development
The International Astronomical Union's (IAU) Office of Astronomy for Development has established new coordinating offices in Armenia, Colombia, Jordan, Nigeria and Portugal.
New era of astronomy as gravitational wave hunt begins
Australian scientists are in the hunt for the last missing piece of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, gravitational waves, as the Advanced LIGO Project in the United States comes online.

Related Astronomy Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...