A search for protection against chemotherapy cardiotoxicity

December 20, 2007

Researchers at the University of Grenoble, in France, have discovered that erythropoietin administration prevents acute cardiotoxic effects induced by doxorubicin and trastuzumab exposures. The research article describing this work entitled "Erythropoietin pretreatment protects against acute chemotherapy toxicity in isolated rat hearts" will be featured in the January 2008 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine. Although rare, cardiotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer treatment. Indeed, the use of chemotherapeutic agents such as anthracycline or trastuzumab in oncology is limited by their cardiac toxicity. Therefore, it is of interest to identify new protective agents preventing these adverse effects.

"The increasing use of doxorubicin and trastuzumab in adjuvant breast cancer therapy and the growing population of long-term pediatric cancer survivors mean that, more than ever, cardiotoxicity will continue to remain an important issue for oncology. Cardiomyopathy induced by chronic chemotherapy may result, at least in part, from acute cardiotoxic effects accompanying each drug exposure." said Professor Mireille Mousseau, head of the Department of Oncology.

The research team, led by Christophe Ribuot, a professor of pharmacology, explored the beneficial cardioprotective effect afforded by recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) against various stresses, through experimental and clinical investigations.

"This study is an excellent illustration of a fruitful collaboration between researchers in experimental pharmacology, Christophe Ribuot and Marie Joyeux-Faure, and the oncologist M. Mousseau. Here, we observed for the first time that only a unique rhEPO administration prevents cardiac damage induced by an acute doxorubicin or trastuzumab exposure, using the isolated rat heart model." said the article's first author Amandine Ramond. "RhEPO administration could, therefore, be used during chemotherapy administration to reduce acute cardiotoxic effects accompanying each drug exposure and, potentially, to prevent long-term development of cardiomyopathy. Further clinical investigations are now needed to explore the potential benefit of rhEPO in oncology."

Dr. Steven R. Goodman, Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Biology and Medicine, said "Amandine Ramond and her colleagues have provided an insightful study demonstrating that rhEPO can reduce the cardiotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and trastzumab, in a rat heart model. If rhEPO has similar effects on humans then this study will be of substantial benefit to cancer patients worldwide".
-end-
Experimental Biology and Medicine is a journal dedicated to the publication of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the biomedical sciences. The journal was first established in 1903.

Experimental Biology and Medicine is the journal of the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine. To learn about the benefits of society membership visit www.sebm.org. If you are interested in publishing in the journal please visit www.ebmonline.org.

Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Related Trastuzumab Articles from Brightsurf:

Opening an autophagy window as the apoptosis door starts to close
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers have successfully attached the cancer cell-targeting antibody Trastuzumab to a previously reported supermolecule that induces autophagic cell death.

Yale Cancer Center study validates combination therapy for aggressive endometrial cancer
Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found that combining the targeted drug trastuzumab with chemotherapy significantly improves survival rates for women with a rare, aggressive form of endometrial cancer.

Oncotarget: Second line trastuzumab emtansine following horizontal dual blockade
Volume 11, Issue 22 of Oncotarget reported that despite relevant medical advancements, metastatic breast cancer remains an incurable disease.

Trastuzumab combined with trimodality treatment does not improve outcomes for patients
Results of the NRG Oncology clinical trial RTOG 1010 indicated that the addition of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab to neoadjuvant trimodality treatment did not improve disease-free survival (DFS) outcomes for patient with HER2 overexpressing local and locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma.

Trastuzumab achieves slight reduction in recurrence for women with HER2-positive DCIS
The addition of the monoclonal antibody therapy Trastuzumab to radiotherapy did not reach the protocol objective of a 36% reduction in the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rate for women with HER2-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-43.

Trastuzumab deruxtecan shows early promise in patients with non-breast/gastric cancers
A HER2-targeted antibody-drug conjugate, fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki (Enhertu), showed signs of clinical activity in multiple non-breast/non-gastric cancer types, according to results from a phase I study.

Adding tucatinib to drug combination extends survival for advanced HER2+ breast cancer patients
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported study results showing the addition of tucatinib to capecitabine (Xeloda) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, with and without brain metastasis according to results of the HER2CLIMB clinical trial.

Biosimilar for HER2+ breast cancer: Overall response rate matches reference trastuzumab
The trastuzumab biosimilar HLX02 achieved similar overall response rate to reference trastuzumab in women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) recurrent or previously untreated metastatic breast cancer, according to a large, randomised phase III study reported at the ESMO Asia 2019 Congress.

Two-in-one drug combining Herceptin with chemotherapy keeps women's breast cancers at bay
Guiding chemotherapy to a tumor by attaching it to the antibody-based target drug Herceptin (trastuzumab) is effective at treating women with breast cancer who have no other treatment options, a new clinical trial shows.

Simple and fast method for radiolabelling antibodies against breast cancer
Radioactive antibodies that target cancer cells are used for medical diagnostics with PET imaging or for targeted radioimmunotherapy.

Read More: Trastuzumab News and Trastuzumab Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.