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Levin's paper selected for presentation at MLA convention, Dec. 30

December 20, 2007

HOBOKEN, N.J. -- A paper by Stevens Institute of Technology Professor Susan Levin has been selected for presentation at the Modern Language Association's (MLA) 123rd annual convention in Chicago on December 30, 2007. Levin's paper, "Worst Suspicions: Memoirs of Mrs. Billington from Her Birth," focuses on the life of Elizabeth Billington, prodigy, composer and soprano extraordinaire. In 1792, publisher James Ridgway printed Billington's purported memoirs, a text organized around 15 letters that the diva wrote to her mother, also a singer. In her paper, Levin points out that Billington's life story, however, is constructed to make a sensational attack on a woman who attained all the power of her profession.

Levin is a Professor in Stevens' College of Arts and Letters and Program Director for the Department of Literature and Communications. She holds a bachelor's degree from Cornell University, and a master's and doctorate degree from Columbia University. Levin has performed in opera and musical comedy throughout the US. Her forthcoming book is the Longman Cultural Edition of Dorothy Wordsworth. Founded in 1883 by teachers and scholars, the MLA promotes the study and teaching of language and literature. Levin's paper is part of the MLA's division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing. For more information on MLA's 123rd annual convention, visit http://www.mla.org/convention.
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About Stevens Institute of Technology

Founded in 1870, Stevens Institute of Technology is one of the leading technological universities in the world dedicated to learning and research. Through its broad-based curricula, nurturing of creative inventiveness, and cross disciplinary research, the Institute is at the forefront of global challenges in engineering, science, and technology management. Partnerships and collaboration between, and among, business, industry, government and other universities contribute to the enriched environment of the Institute. A new model for technology commercialization in academe, known as Technogenesis®, involves external partners in launching business enterprises to create broad opportunities and shared value. Stevens offers baccalaureates, master's and doctoral degrees in engineering, science, computer science and management, in addition to a baccalaureate degree in the humanities and liberal arts, and in business and technology. The university has a total enrollment of 2,040 undergraduate and 3,085 graduate students, and a worldwide online enrollment of 2,250, with about 400 full-time faculty. Stevens' graduate programs have attracted international participation from China, India, Southeast Asia, Europe and Latin America. Additional information may be obtained from its web page at www.stevens.edu.

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Stevens Institute of Technology

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