Stevens' Center for Maritime Systems acquires advanced research equipment from DURIP

December 20, 2007

HOBOKEN, N.J. -- The Center for Maritime Systems at Stevens Institute of Technology recently acquired three pieces of advanced research equipment through a $522,450 grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP). The first piece of equipment, the Computerized Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine, was installed on Thursday, December 6, 2007, and will be used for constructing ship models, appendages and other hydrodynamic research equipment.

The other two machines-a Planar Motion Mechanism (PMM) for maneuvering studies, and a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system for flow visualization-are scheduled to be installed by January 2008.
-end-
For more information on this advanced research equipment, please contact Raju Datla, Research Associate Professor, at rdatla@stevens.edu, or Alan Blumberg, Director of the Center for Maritime Systems, at ablumber@stevens.edu.



About Stevens Institute of Technology


Founded in 1870, Stevens Institute of Technology is one of the leading technological universities in the world dedicated to learning and research. Through its broad-based curricula, nurturing of creative inventiveness, and cross disciplinary research, the Institute is at the forefront of global challenges in engineering, science, and technology management. Partnerships and collaboration between, and among, business, industry, government and other universities contribute to the enriched environment of the Institute. A new model for technology commercialization in academe, known as Technogenesis®, involves external partners in launching business enterprises to create broad opportunities and shared value. Stevens offers baccalaureates, master's and doctoral degrees in engineering, science, computer science and management, in addition to a baccalaureate degree in the humanities and liberal arts, and in business and technology. The university has a total enrollment of 2,040 undergraduate and 3,085 graduate students, and a worldwide online enrollment of 2,250, with about 400 full-time faculty. Stevens' graduate programs have attracted international participation from China, India, Southeast Asia, Europe and Latin America. Additional information may be obtained from its web page at www.stevens.edu.

For the latest news about Stevens, please visit www.StevensNewsService.com.

Stevens Institute of Technology

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