Acid suppressive medication may increase risk of pneumonia

December 20, 2010

Using acid suppressive medications, such as proton pump inhibitors and histamine2 receptor antagonists, may increase the risk of developing pneumonia, states an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj092129.pdf.

Acid suppressive drugs are the second leading medication worldwide, totaling over US$26 billion in sales in 2005. Recently, medical literature has looked at unrecognized side effects in popular medications and their impact on public health.

This systematic review, which incorporated all relevant studies on the association of acid suppressive medications and pneumonia that could be identified to August 2009, showed that out of every 200 inpatients being treated with acid suppressive medication one will develop pneumonia.

"Several previous studies have shown that treatment with acid-suppressive drugs might be associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia in adults and children. However, the association between use of acid-suppressive drugs and risk of pneumonia has been inconsistent, writes Dr. Chun-Sick Eom and Dr. Sang Min Park, Department of Family Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea with coauthors. "Given the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors and histamine2-receptor antagonists, clarifying the potential impact of acid-suppressive therapy on the risk of pneumonia is of great importance to public health."

Since 40-70% of hospitalized patients receive these drugs it may mean that deaths from hospital-acquired pneumonia could be caused by acid suppressive medications. The impact of acid suppressive medication on community-acquired pneumonia could be much greater.

The authors conclude that physicians should use caution when prescribing acid suppressive medication, especially in patients with a high risk of developing pneumonia.
-end-


Canadian Medical Association Journal

Related Pneumonia Articles from Brightsurf:

Vaccine proves effective against the most severe type of pneumonia
A pneumococcal vaccine was effective at protecting children in Laos against the most severe type of pneumonia, a new study has found.

Osteoporosis treatment may also protect against pneumonia
A recent study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) such as alendronate, which are widely used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis, are linked with lower risks of pneumonia and of dying from pneumonia.

Elderly patients with pneumonia twice as likely to die as those with broken hips, yet underestimate the danger of pneumonia
Elderly patients who are hospitalised with pneumonia are twice as likely to die as those hospitalised with hip fractures -- yet many elderly people fail to accurately assess their risk of pneumonia, concludes research due to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).

Pneumonia recovery reprograms immune cells of the lung
Researchers have determined that after lungs recover from infection, alveolar macrophages (immune cells that live in the lungs and help protect the lungs against infection) are different in multiple ways and those differences persist indefinitely.

Skin and mucous membrane lesions as complication of pneumonia
Painful inflammatory lesions of the skin and mucous membranes may occur in children who develop bacterial pneumonia.

Vaccine reduces likelihood of severe pneumonia
A new study has found severe pneumonia decreases by 35 per cent in children who receive a vaccine against a pneumonia-causing bacteria.

Bacteria in pneumonia attack using bleaching agent
Research shows that bacteria use hydrogen peroxide to weaken the immune system and cause pneumonia.

Many kids with pneumonia get unnecessary antibiotics, chest X-rays
Preschool children with community-acquired pneumonia often receive unnecessary tests and treatment at outpatient clinics and emergency departments, according to a nationally representative study led by Todd Florin, M.D., MSCE, from Ann & Robert H.

Certain psychiatric drugs linked with elevated pneumonia risk
A review of published studies indicates that use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine related drugs (BZRDs), which are prescribed to treat various psychiatric diseases, may increase the risk of pneumonia.

Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia, study finds
Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research.

Read More: Pneumonia News and Pneumonia Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.