Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation awards breakthrough scientists

December 20, 2010

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named the first recipients of the Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists. This new award provides additional funding to scientists completing a prestigious Damon Runyon Fellowship Award who have greatly exceeded the Foundation's highest expectations and are most likely to make paradigm-shifting breakthroughs that transform the way we prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

Recipients of the Frey Award were selected by leaders in biomedical research based on the following criteria: exceptional productivity and significant accomplishments during the Damon Runyon Fellowship; potential of the scientist to become a leader in the field of cancer research; potential of the research to impact the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of one or more forms of cancer. They will each receive $100,000 to be used toward their research.

The Dale F. Frey Award for Breakthrough Scientists is named for the Foundation's retiring Chairman, in recognition of his 16 years of visionary leadership and role in transforming Damon Runyon into the premier charity funding today's best young cancer researchers.

Recipients of the Dale F. Frey Award:

Ken Cadwell, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow at Washington University in Saint Louis '08-'10)

Dr. Cadwell studies the link between inflammation and diseases such as cancer and Crohn's disease. He has discovered a new phenomenon whereby intestinal disease, in mouse, is triggered by a particular genetic mutation combined with viral infection. His long-term research goal is to learn how viral infections disrupt the balance of our immune system, hopefully leading to therapeutics that target these processes and prevent cancer. Dr. Cadwell recently moved to New York City, where he is now Assistant Professor at the New York University School of Medicine.

L. Stirling Churchman, PhD (Damon Runyon Fellow at University of California, San Francisco '08-'11)

The process of transcription (how DNA is copied to RNA) is a key point at which gene expression is regulated. Dr. Churchman has developed a new technology that for the first time allows transcription to be examined at high resolution in live cells. She will use this technology to address questions about how transcription is controlled, potentially identifying new targets and pathways for cancer treatment.
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DAMON RUNYON CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION

To accelerate breakthroughs, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation provides today's best young scientists with funding to pursue innovative research. The Foundation has gained worldwide prominence in cancer research by identifying outstanding researchers and physician-scientists. Eleven scientists supported by the Foundation have received the Nobel Prize, and others are heads of cancer centers and leaders of renowned research programs. Each of its award programs is extremely competitive, with less than 10% of applications funded. Since its founding in 1946, the Foundation has invested over $230 million and funded more than 3,250 scientists. This year, it will invest approximately $10 million in the most outstanding young investigators in the nation.

100% of all donations to the Foundation are used to support scientific research. Its administrative and fundraising costs are paid from its Damon Runyon Broadway Tickets Service and endowment.

For more information visit www.damonrunyon.org

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

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