Attic vases from Athens inspired Cypriote pottery

December 20, 2011

Athenian pottery was exported to both east and west. In Cyprus the pottery was exported for about 300 years and it became a part of the Cypriots' life. It also inspired the local potters and painters to create their own versions of the imagery and enrich them with local elements. This is described in a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Niki Eriksson, who has studied the Attic pottery found in Cyprus, points out that the pottery was imported from the early 500s BC to the late 300 BC, she also adds that a similar distribution to the Eastern Mediterranean suggests that a great part of the Cypriote import is of the same mercantile transactions, which were operated by the Phoenicians. There are, however, reasons to believe that there were direct commercial contacts with Athens and that private individuals who visited Athens brought some of the pottery to Cyprus.

Cypriots showed a particular preference for drinking vessels and perfume flasks. Niki Eriksson suggests that the Cypriots wanted a precious piece of pottery that they could use in their everyday activities and at the same time honor their gods and dead ancestors. Kraters which, were big bowls in which wine and water was mixed were the most popular votive gifts and were most probably used during the religious festivities.

The iconographical representations reflect the imaginary world of the Greeks. By studying the iconography one may follow the art development, the personalities of the pottery painters and the taste of the different customers.

The popularity of the pottery owed not only to its high quality but also to its rich iconography, which enabled the customer to use it in different occasions as for example the religious feasts at the sanctuaries where the rituals and the visual symbols found on the vessels helped the island's inhabitants to form common culture and identities.
-end-
The thesis has been successfully defended.

University of Gothenburg

Related Pottery Articles from Brightsurf:

Can individual differences be detected in same-shaped pottery vessels by unknown craftsmen?
An interdisciplinary research team has investigated whether there are quantitative differences that can be used to identify individual potters who make traditional, fixed-shape vessels that have been made in the same way for generations.

The oldest known cremation in the near east dates to 7000 BC
Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a study published August 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fanny Bocquentin of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and colleagues.

Study traces spread of early dairy farming across Western Europe
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of York, analysed the molecular remains of food left in pottery used by the first farmers who settled along the Atlantic Coast of Europe from 7,000 to 6,000 years ago.

Study sheds light on unique culinary traditions of prehistoric hunter-gatherers
A new study suggests the culinary tastes of ancient people were not solely dictated by the foods available in a particular area, but also influenced by the traditions and habits of cultural groups.

Milk pioneers: East African herders consumed milk 5,000 years ago
Animal milk was essential to east African herders at least 5,000 years ago, according to a new study.

Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
A team from University of Bristol developed a new method to date archaeological pottery using fat residues remaining in the pot wall from cooking.

Hot pots helped ancient Siberian hunters survive the Ice Age
A new study shows that ancient Siberian hunters created heat resistant pots so that they could cook hot meals - surviving the harshest seasons of the ice age by extracting nutritious bone grease and marrow from meat.

Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims
Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men -- stories long dismissed as myths.

Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves
Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a study released Aug.

Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador
Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Polit├ęcnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador), and Tohoku University (Japan) found shards of ceramic vessels referred to the cultural sediments of early periods of Real Alto site.

Read More: Pottery News and Pottery Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.