Are phages our best bet against antibiotic-resistant bacteria?

December 20, 2017

Bacteriophages, or simply phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria, and they hold considerable potential for combatting antibiotic-resistance and other threats to human health. Timed with the hundredth anniversary of their discovery, a new review published in the British Journal of Pharmacology examines the challenges and opportunities of developing phages as health-promoting, commercially-viable biopharmaceuticals.

In the review, Amanda Forde, PhD, and Colin Hill, PhD, of the APC Microbiome Institute at University College Cork, in Ireland, note that phages have complex relationships with bacteria in the gut that could affect health and disease. "Through an intricate 'predator-prey' strategy, phages have the ability to alter the microbial balance within an ecosystem, and given that they are the most abundant biological entities on earth, it would be odd to ignore or underestimate their power and potential," said Dr. Forde. She explained that phages outnumber their bacterial prey by a factor of 10 to 1, and that they have been proposed as the agents of change in recipients of faecal microbiota transplantations used to treat resistant or recurring bowel disease.

"We tend to think of phages as nature's 'nano-machines', self-assembling complex biological survival machines capable of replicating faster than any other biological agent," said Dr. Hill. "They are highly diverse, highly dynamic, and highly specific to their targets, and as antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs' continue to emerge around the world, they may be among our best allies in the future."

Despite having been discovered a century ago, their use in clinical therapy continues to encounter several challenges. "One of the challenges lies in the fact that more than 90% of phage populations are as yet unidentified, and therefore considered to be the 'dark matter' of the biological world," said Dr. Hill. "Coupled with manufacturing challenges, regulatory hurdles and the need for clinical validation, the path to pharma may seem long, but researchers are heading in the right direction."

Phages were used for more than 75 years as therapy in Eastern Europe, but they fell out of favour in the western world when antibiotics were discovered. They are now becoming attractive again because of the rise in antibiotic resistance. A unique selling point is their host specificity, meaning little or no collateral damage to neighbouring ('good') bacteria, and they do not drive the development of resistance in non-target bacterial species.

"Whilst regulated phage therapy may take some time, it has been highly successful in recent 'compassionate' cases where patients' lives were on the line," said Dr. Forde. "But for regulated interventions, we need to play the waiting game as more genomic, physiological, pharmacological, and clinical data are gathered. And wait we will."
-end-
Additional Information

The information contained in this release is protected by copyright. Members of the media may sign up for embargoed news or to request a copy of any study please contact:

Dawn Peters (US)
1-781-388-8408
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

Follow us on Twitter @WileyNews

Full citation: "Phages of life - the path to pharma." Amanda Forde and Colin Hill. British Journal of Pharmacology; Published Online: December 20, 2017 (DOI: 10.1111/bph.14106).

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bph.14106

Author Contact:

Catherine Buckley
Communications Manager
APC Microbiome Institute
University College Cork
C.Buckley@ucc.ie.

About the Journal

The British Journal of Pharmacology is a broad-based journal giving leading international coverage of all aspects of pharmacology research. Its scope includes all aspects of pharmacology from hypothesis generation and target validation through to model development, safety pharmacology and to early translational research. BJP's 2015 Impact Factor is 5.259, and as such it is a leading general research pharmacology journal (Thomson Reuters Science Citation Index).

About The British Pharmacological Society

The British Pharmacological Society is a charity with a mission to promote and advance the whole spectrum of pharmacology. Founded in 1931, it is now a global community at the heart of pharmacology, with over 3,500 members from more than 60 countries worldwide. The Society leads the way in the research and application of pharmacology around the world through its scientific meetings, educational resources and peer-reviewed journals: the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, and the British Journal of Pharmacology, which includes the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, featuring open access overviews of the key properties of over 1,700 human therapeutic targets and their drugs, and links to http://www.guidetopharmacology.org.

Press Office
44-207-239-0180
nick.courtney@bps.ac.uk

About Wiley

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

Wiley

Related Bacteria Articles from Brightsurf:

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation.

How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth.

Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better
A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics.

Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health.

Microcensus in bacteria
Bacillus subtilis can determine proportions of different groups within a mixed population.

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender.

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide
Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds.

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone.

The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile?

Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed.

Read More: Bacteria News and Bacteria Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.