Heart disease study highlights Scottish ethnic groups most at risk

December 21, 2011

Scots of Pakistani origin are 50 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with chest pain and angina than those of Indian ethnicity, a study has found.

Scots of Indian and Pakistani origin also have much greater levels of hospital admissions for both conditions than people of white Scottish ethnicity.

Those of Pakistani origin were twice as likely to be admitted to hospital with chest pain compared with white Scots, according to the University of Edinburgh study.

Scottish residents who defined their ethnicity as Indian were also 40 per cent more likely to be admitted compared with those of white Scottish ethnicity.

The research also shows that white Scots were one-fifth more likely to be admitted to hospital with angina than other white British, mainly English, living in Scotland.

However, residents in Scotland of white Irish ethnicity have similar rates of hospital admissions with angina and chest pain to those of white Scottish ethnicity

Chinese people in Scotland, in contrast to other ethnic groups, have the lowest levels of hospital admissions for chest pain and angina. They study found that they are one-third less likely to be admitted to hospital than white Scots. They are also twice less likely to be admitted to hospital with chest pain and angina than people of Indian ethnicity in Scotland and are three times less likely to be admitted when compared with those of Pakistani origin.

The differences in admissions are most likely due to lifestyle-related factors such as diet, physical activity and smoking.

Such findings are important as they can help with both prevention as well as planning of healthcare services on a European-wide scale.

Professor Raj Bhopal, of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Population Health Sciences, said: "Scots have among the highest rates of heart attacks in the world, but we have shown that, among residents of Scotland, those of Pakistani origin followed by those of Indian origin have beaten them. The most amazing thing is how the Chinese population has such low rates of heart disease-everyone in Scotland has something to learn from them. "
-end-
The study, published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, combined Census data on ethnicity and NHS data for hospital discharges, and community and hospital deaths.

The study was a collaboration between The University of Edinburgh, National Records of Scotland and Information Services, Scotland (ISD), and was funded by the Chief Scientist Office, Scottish Government Health Directorates.

University of Edinburgh

Related Chest Pain Articles from Brightsurf:

New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events.

Brain activity during psychological stress may predict chest pain in people with heart disease
The brain's reaction to stress could be an important indicator of angina (chest pain) among people with known heart disease.

Chest pain, stress tests warrant attention even if arteries are clear
Patients who experience chest pain and have abnormal results on a cardiac stress test but who do not have blocked arteries often experience changes in their symptoms and stress test results over time, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).

Women carry heavier burden of chest pain, but less artery narrowing
Women with coronary artery disease that reduces blood flow and oxygen to the heart muscle (ischemia) have significantly more chest pain caused by plaque build-up, yet less extensive disease as compared with men, according to new research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).

More isn't better when it comes to evaluating chest pain
New and more effective tests are needed to help predict heart attacks and other major cardiac events in patients with chest pain, the second most common reason for emergency department visits in the US.

Artificial intelligence could prevent unneeded tests in patients with stable chest pain
Artificial intelligence (AI) could prevent unnecessary diagnostic tests in patients with stable chest pain, according to research presented today at ICNC 2019.

Kaiser Permanente improves emergency care for patients with chest pain
Emergency physicians at Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Southern California reduced hospital admissions and cardiac stress testing by using new criteria to assess the level of risk patients with chest pain have for subsequent cardiac events.

Treatment for underdiagnosed cause of debilitating chest pain
Researchers find an effective way to treat an underdiagnosed condition that can cause heart attack and heart-attack-like symptoms.

Diagnostic protocol effective in identifying ED patients with acute chest pain
A relatively new accelerated diagnostic protocol is effective in identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain who can be safely sent home without being hospitalized or undergoing comprehensive cardiac testing, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Chest pain drug falls short in preventing first episode of ventricular arrhythmia or death
A trial of more than 1,000 patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators found that the drug ranolazine (used to treat chest pain; brand name Ranexa®) was safe but didn't decrease the likelihood of the first occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias or death in this high-risk population.

Read More: Chest Pain News and Chest Pain Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.