12 CFSP economists to speak at the American Economic Association Conference in San Diego

December 21, 2012

(Dec. 21, 2012--Chicago, IL) Twelve economists with the Consortium on Financial Systems and Poverty (CFSP) are scheduled to present at the annual meeting of the American Economic Association (AEA) in San Diego on Jan. 4-6, 2013. Last year 10 CFSP economists spoke at the conference.

Consortium economists will speak on a variety of topics primarily focusing on development economics. Their schedule and topics of discussion are listed below. (For a complete list of scheduled presentations, please visit the AEA's website: http://www.aeaweb.org/). Most presentations will be hosted at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego.

The annual AEA conference is designed to help mid-career economists and is tailored primarily to faculty at liberal arts colleges and teaching-oriented state universities. The lecturers are leading scholars whose focus is on content to help improve teaching and research. The three topics for the January 2013 conference are Labor Economics, Public Finance and Time-series Econometrics.

The CFSP economists who will be presenting are:

Robert M. Townsend, (MIT) and CFSP Principal Investigator and Faculty Director, is scheduled to give the T. W. Schultz Memorial Lecture at 5 pm on Friday, Jan. 4.

Abhijit Banerjee, (MIT) will present at two sessions. His presentation on "Diffusion of Microfinance" will be on Jan. 4 at 2:30 p.m. His presentation "On the road: Access to Transportation Infrastructure and Economic Growth in China" will be on Jan. 6 at 10:15 a.m

Francisco J. Buera, (UCLA) is scheduled to present four times. His talk "Productivity Growth and Capital Flows: The Dynamics of Reforms" is on Jan. 4 at 2:30 p.m. "Aggregate Implications of a Credit Crunch" is on Jan. 5 at 10:15 a.m. "Idea Flows, Economic Growth, and Trade" is on Jan. 5 at 2:30 p.m. He will present "Services and the Dynamics of Female Labor Supply" along with CFSP seed grantee Joseph Kaboski on Jan. 6 at 8 a.m.

Arun Chandrasekhar (MIT) will be a discussant twice: "Household, Microenterprise and Agricultural Finance in Developing Countries" on Jan. 4 at 2:30 p.m.; "Social Network, Peer Effects and Politics" on Jan. 6 at 1 p.m.

Dean Corbae (Wisconsin) will present "The Rise of Securitization: A Recursive Security Design Approach" on Jan. 5 at 10:15 a.m.

Douglas Diamond (UofC) will be a discussant in "The Credit Crisis and Risk Management Instruments" on Jan. 6 at 10:15 a.m.

Joseph Kaboski (Notre Dame) will speak twice. His talk "Trade, Inventories, and the International Propagation of Business Cycles" will be on Jan. 5 at 2:30 p.m. He will present "Services and Dynamics of Female Labor Supply" with CFSP Member Francisco Buera on Jan. 6 at 8 a.m.

Roberto Rigobon (MIT) will speak three times. He will be the panel moderator for the discussion "Contrasting Policy Advice at Time of Crisis: Latin America Then, Advanced Economies Now: What Have We Learned?" on Jan. 5 at 8 a.m. He will preside over the discussion "International Financial Markets" on Jan. 5 at 2:30 p.m. and he will present "Measuring Sovereign Contagion in Europe" on Jan. 6 at 10:15 a.m.

Kenneth Singleton (Stanford) will present twice. His talk "A Robust Analysis of the Risk-Structure of Equilibrium Term Structures of Bond Yields" will be presented on Jan. 5 at 10:15 a.m. His talk "Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices" will be presented on Jan. 5 at 2:30 p.m.

Tavneet Suri (MIT) will present "Transaction Networks: Evidence from Mobile Money in Kenya" on Jan. 6 at 1 p.m.

Christopher Udry (Yale) will participate in two presentations. He will be a discussant in the "Household, Microenterprise and Agricultural Finance in Developing Countries" on Jan. 4 at 2:30 p.m. He will present "Financial Markets and the Returns to Fertilizer" on Jan. 5 at 8 a.m.

Christopher Woodruff (Warwick) will speak twice. He will present "Does Savings Lead to More Investment in Microenterprises?" on Jan. 5 at 8 a.m. His talk "What Stimulates Growth of Microenterprises?" will be on Jan. 6 at 10:15 a.m.
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The Consortium on Financial Systems and Poverty is based at the University of Chicago and is a private research organization comprised of leading and emerging economists. Their goal is to improve the lives of the world's poor and to reduce poverty through helping to identify, design and implement more efficient financial systems. CFSP can be found online at www.cfsp.org on Twitter @CFSPoverty.

Consortium on Financial Systems & Poverty

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