Study finds genetic convergence between cognition and neurodevelopmental disorders

December 21, 2015

Singapore, Dec. 22, 2015 - For the first time, a study has demonstrated a genetic convergence between cognition and neurodevelopmental disorders in the human brain. These findings, published online in Nature Neuroscience on Dec. 21, 2015 2015, provide an alternate starting point for scientists to develop therapies for such disorders.

A team of researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and Imperial College London (ICL) identified a network of genes in the brain that regulates normal cognitive abilities. This network is also linked to a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, epilepsy, intellectual disability and schizophrenia. In many neurodevelopmental disorders, the impairment of cognitive abilities is reported to be a core clinical feature. However, no explanation had been provided for this association, until now.

The Duke-NUS and ICL team began their research by studying all genes that are active in the human hippocampus -- a component of the brain that plays an important role in the formation and consolidation of our memories. They identified several gene networks and pinpointed a significant network of 150 genes, found in mice and healthy humans, which has a major influence on general cognitive abilities. In addition, they found that these genes are already highly active following birth, which is a clue that the genes play a role in brain development and neurodevelopmental disease.

Analysing all data available to date on the genes that cause neurodevelopmental disease, the team observed that about a third of the genes in the network are mutated in various neurodevelopmental disorders. These results were unforeseen, as the majority of these genes that were known to cause neurodevelopmental disease had never been connected to each other before.

The identification of this gene network provides the starting point to develop precision medicine strategies to target the entire pathway or genes specific to neurodevelopmental disorders. The Duke-NUS team aims to identify the regulatory factors of this network, which can help to develop future strategies to treat neurodevelopmental disorders. All gene network data generated from this study have been made accessible online for other researchers and scientists.

Associate Professor Enrico Petretto, senior co-author of the study and head of the Systems Genetics of Complex Disease Laboratory at Duke-NUS, hopes that these findings will contribute to advances in the field of neurobiology and neurological disease.

"We believe that studying gene networks in the brain can give us extra clues about the genetic cause of neurodevelopmental disorders and of their neurological comorbidities. The results of our study in the human brain show a previously unappreciated functional relationship between cognition and neurodevelopmental disorders' genes. This gives us the first explanation to why the two seem to be related," said Assoc Prof Petretto.

Duke-NUS and ICL researchers employed a novel approach called Systems Genetics to study networks of genes, rather than investigating the role of single genes in neurodevelopmental disease and variable cognitive abilities. In this study, the key interactions between all genes in the human brain were analysed. These crucial interactions inform networks of genes that, like a football team, are likely to display a more complex performance than the individual player.

Assoc Prof Petretto explained that the team's strategy to understand the genetic causes of complex disease could be compared to how one may take on a rival football team. To outplay a rival team, the focus should not be placed on a single player, even if it happens to be a key player such as Lionel Messi. Instead, understanding how the eleven players cooperate, with or without Messi's contribution, and breaking down their coach's game strategy, which in this study refers to the regulatory factors of the gene network, is critical to creating a long-term winning strategy.
-end-
The study was supported by funds from the Duke-NUS Signature Research Programme, with funding from the Singapore Ministry of Health.

For media queries, please contact:

Ms Dharshini Subbiah
dharshini.subbiah@duke-nus.edu.sg
65-9616-7532
Duke-NUS Medical School

About Duke-NUS Medical School

The Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) was established in 2005 as a strategic collaboration between the Duke University School of Medicine, located in North Carolina, USA, and the National University of Singapore (NUS). Duke-NUS offers a graduate-entry, 4-year MD (Doctor of Medicine) training programme based on the unique Duke model of education, with one year dedicated to independent study and research projects of a basic science or clinical nature. Duke-NUS also offers MD/PhD and PhD programmes. Duke-NUS has five Signature Research Programmes: Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Neuroscience and Behavioural Disorders, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, and Health Services and Systems Research.

2015 marks Duke-NUS' 10th anniversary. In this time, Duke-NUS and SingHealth have established a strategic partnership in academic medicine that will guide and promote the future of medicine, tapping on and combining the collective strengths of SingHealth's clinical expertise and Duke-NUS' biomedical sciences research and medical education capabilities.

For more information, please visit http://www.duke-nus.edu.sg

Duke-NUS Medical School

Related Brain Articles from Brightsurf:

Glioblastoma nanomedicine crosses into brain in mice, eradicates recurring brain cancer
A new synthetic protein nanoparticle capable of slipping past the nearly impermeable blood-brain barrier in mice could deliver cancer-killing drugs directly to malignant brain tumors, new research from the University of Michigan shows.

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age 2
A study by UNC researchers finds that neurodevelopmental scores and gray matter volumes at age two years did not differ between children who had MRI-confirmed asymptomatic subdural hemorrhages when they were neonates, compared to children with no history of subdural hemorrhage.

New model of human brain 'conversations' could inform research on brain disease, cognition
A team of Indiana University neuroscientists has built a new model of human brain networks that sheds light on how the brain functions.

Human brain size gene triggers bigger brain in monkeys
Dresden and Japanese researchers show that a human-specific gene causes a larger neocortex in the common marmoset, a non-human primate.

Unique insight into development of the human brain: Model of the early embryonic brain
Stem cell researchers from the University of Copenhagen have designed a model of an early embryonic brain.

An optical brain-to-brain interface supports information exchange for locomotion control
Chinese researchers established an optical BtBI that supports rapid information transmission for precise locomotion control, thus providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of fast BtBI for real-time behavioral control.

Transplanting human nerve cells into a mouse brain reveals how they wire into brain circuits
A team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Vincent Bonin (VIB-KU Leuven, Université libre de Bruxelles and NERF) showed how human nerve cells can develop at their own pace, and form highly precise connections with the surrounding mouse brain cells.

Brain scans reveal how the human brain compensates when one hemisphere is removed
Researchers studying six adults who had one of their brain hemispheres removed during childhood to reduce epileptic seizures found that the remaining half of the brain formed unusually strong connections between different functional brain networks, which potentially help the body to function as if the brain were intact.

Alcohol byproduct contributes to brain chemistry changes in specific brain regions
Study of mouse models provides clear implications for new targets to treat alcohol use disorder and fetal alcohol syndrome.

Scientists predict the areas of the brain to stimulate transitions between different brain states
Using a computer model of the brain, Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Josephine Cruzat, a member of his team, together with a group of international collaborators, have developed an innovative method published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Sept.

Read More: Brain News and Brain Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.