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How common is Hepatitis C infection in each US state?

December 21, 2018

BottomLine: Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of illness and death in the United States and injection drug use is likely fueling many new cases. This study, which used survey and vital statistics data, suggests about 1 percent of adults (0.93 percent) were living with hepatitis C from 2013 to 2016, and how common infections were varied by state and region. Nine states accounted for about 52 percent of all people living with hepatitis C (California, Texas, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Tennessee and North Carolina). The highest rates of infection were frequently in states heavily impacted by the opioid crisis, with 5 of 9 states with the highest number of hepatitis C infections in the Appalachian region. The results of this observational study could help to guide state-level prevention and treatment efforts because the resources necessary will vary by jurisdiction.
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Authors: Eli S. Rosenberg, Ph.D., University at Albany School of Public Health, State University of New York, Rensselaer, New York, and coauthors

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.6371)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Want to embed a link to this study in your story?: Links will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.6371

About JAMA Network Open:JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

JAMA Network Open

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