EUREKA-ITEA solution enhances European software testing capabilities

December 22, 2005

The EUREKA ITEA Cluster TT-Medal project has achieved a major breakthrough for the European electronics industry by developing a generic solution to enable automated testing of software systems. The methodologies and tools developed in the project were validated in industrial-scale demonstrators for automotive, railway, financial and telecommunications applications, proving the feasibility of a significant improvement in test efficiency, effectiveness and product quality. This, in turn, leads to significant cuts in testing costs. As a result, the TT-Medal project provides a unique opportunity for European suppliers and consultants to position themselves better in a world market previously dominated by the USA.

Software increasingly provides the core functionality of electronics products - from mobile phones to railway signalling. Testing is fundamental to developing software-intensive systems, as the sooner errors are identified, the cheaper they are to fix. But testing is extremely difficult to achieve exhaustively. There is also a serious shortage of software developers in Europe, slowing time to market.

Generic tools

The EUREKA Cluster TT-Medal project developed generic automated testing methodologies and tools based on the TTCN-3, the international standardised testing language from the European Telecommunication Standards Institute (ETSI) that enable systems testing from beginning to end, using common tools. This makes the reuse of test ware between different phases of a product's lifecycle possible -from initial simulation at the design stage to regression testing during maintenance - and also saves on training.

An added advantage of the internationally recognised Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN) language is that is driven by Europe. It can be used for many applications, including mobile communications, wireless local area networks (LANs), digital cordless phones, broadband technologies and Internet protocols. It is more productive, powerful, flexible and extendable than previous approaches, as well as being easier to learn.

The TT-Medal consortium consisted of 11 partners - including telecommunications manufacturers, software test tool suppliers, software test consultancy firms, academia and research centres working in the testing research domain - from three European countries, and was co-ordinated by Nokia in Finland. It set out to develop the tools and methodologies needed to turn the TTCN language into a robust product applicable to many different application domains - from transport to finance - and introduce it into a much wider range of industries.

Three application areas were selected to validate the approach:

  1. Transportation - telematics for information and entertainment systems in cars and interlock subsystems for railway signalling and control;
  2. Telecommunications - 3G radio access network operation and maintenance, GSM mobile terminal location, and 2.5G and 3G mobile module integration; and
  3. Finance - integration of TTCN-3 on both user and application sides of financial distribution systems testing.


While there are differences in specific requirements between applications, many issues are common. All industrial sectors are searching for a universal testing language to combine the different technological areas that need to be tested, although each end-user domain has to be responsible for its own test scenario specifications.

Showing real savings

EUREKA's Cluster TT-Medal project has done much to develop methodologies to enable European industry to test software effectively and efficiently. It has also spread awareness of the TTCN-3 language and its potential applications into new areas. In addition, the case studies played a vital role in disseminating the language far beyond ETSI and the conventional TTCN community.

Software development is an increasing important part of European industrial product development, points out TT-Medal project leader Dr Colin Willcock of Nokia. "Testing requires 25 to 50% of software development resources," he emphasises. "TT-Medal was therefore not an academic exercise. We showed the real benefits of TTCN-3 in our demonstrations. External evaluations indicate that European industry could make up to 50% savings in testing costs.

"Contracted software development in western Europe cost €66,571 million in 2005. Assuming conservatively that 25% of development costs are in testing, this 50% reduction in testing cost would save European industry over €8,000 million a year!"

The project has also benefited both software tool and test device vendors in Europe. The former provide the general test infrastructure for TTCN-3, while the latter supply the specific hardware and interface adaptations necessary to access the devices being tested.

In addition to developing a generalised test platform, the specific research in transport, telecommunications and financial applications resulted in significant advances in test case reuse, validation and automated generation. Moreover, the combination of formal techniques such as data abstraction and constraint solving makes it possible to automate test generation for real industrial-size systems.

Wide dissemination

TT-Medal involved 67 person years and a budget of €9 million. The results were disseminated through an impressive number of papers and publications, as well at several conferences, and laid out in a test training package that includes a book on TTCN-3 testing.

The project also won the ITEA 2005 Achievement Award. "To achieve our objectives, we needed to develop proven solutions including both tools and training. Working with EUREKA and ITEA allowed us to build a consortium of very disparate companies," explains Dr Willcock. "The results of TT-Medal should enable small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) to build new testing tools that will put Europe on the map for testing. And winning the ITEA Achievement 2005 award should now make exploitation easier."
-end-
Project participants:Finland, Germany, The Netherlands

Budget: €10 million

Duration:33 months

Contact:
Nokia
Itämerenkatu 11-13
FIN-00100 Helsinki
Dr Colin Willcock
Tel: +491 732984 166
Email: colin.willcock@nokia.com
Web link: www.tt-medal.org/

EUREKA

Related Language Articles from Brightsurf:

Learning the language of sugars
We're told not to eat too much sugar, but in reality, all of our cells are covered in sugar molecules called glycans.

How effective are language learning apps?
Researchers from Michigan State University recently conducted a study focusing on Babbel, a popular subscription-based language learning app and e-learning platform, to see if it really worked at teaching a new language.

Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil.

'She' goes missing from presidential language
MIT researchers have found that although a significant percentage of the American public believed the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman, people rarely used the pronoun 'she' when referring to the next president before the election.

How does language emerge?
How did the almost 6000 languages of the world come into being?

New research quantifies how much speakers' first language affects learning a new language
Linguistic research suggests that accents are strongly shaped by the speaker's first language they learned growing up.

Why the language-ready brain is so complex
In a review article published in Science, Peter Hagoort, professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at Radboud University and director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, argues for a new model of language, involving the interaction of multiple brain networks.

Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts.

Learning language
When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing.

Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro.

Read More: Language News and Language Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.