FAS releases survey results on the attitudes of scientists toward law enforcement

December 22, 2008

WASHINGTON DC - A survey conducted by the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) revealed that while scientists are disposed to assist in criminal investigations, they often fear working with law enforcement agencies. The survey questions were designed to evaluate the working relationship between FBI field agents and scientists, and the results, published on 22 December 2008 in Science Progress, indicate a reluctance to discuss research with law enforcement and other issues that are specific to the science community. (http://www.scienceprogress.org/2008/12/science-and-law-enforcement)

Anecdotal evidence suggests that some scientists hold negative views of law enforcement. This survey is the first step in recognizing the scope of the problem and addressing it directly.

"The results suggest a larger percentage of scientists show cooler feelings towards the FBI than the general public, and often misunderstand why FBI agents might be contacting them," said Michael Stebbins, Director of Biology Policy at the Federation of American Scientists. "FAS is now working with the FBI to develop specific solutions for alleviating the concerns of scientists and strengthening the relationship between law enforcement and the scientific community."

"The FBI proactively initiated this outreach effort with FAS to engage the scientific community, seek their input, and gather useful information enabling us to improve the relationship. The results of this survey will go a long way to helping us better understand the challenges we face and to overcome some of the misconceptions that exist between law enforcement and scientists," said Dr. Vahid Majidi, Assistant Director of the FBI's Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate. "This information will enable us to devise a strategic plan to address this matter and to continue working with the scientific community to enhance our relationship."

FAS and the FBI will apply the lessons learned in this survey towards developing training materials for field agents to improve the relationship between scientists and law enforcement.

"Perhaps the most important step toward building a better working foundation is for law enforcement agencies, like the FBI, to establish procedures for contacting science experts," said Stebbins. "Many of the scientists' concerns would be alleviated if the specific goals the agent hoped to achieve were clarified. If clear boundaries are established then the cooperation of scientists and law enforcement agents will likely improve."

The Survey:

FAS collaborated with the FBI, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research to develop the survey questions and distribute it to the scientific community. The survey contained a mix of multiple choice and open-ended questions and was distributed to 10,969 AAAS member scientists. 1,332 surveys were completed and the resulting data produced an average margin of error associated with the total data set of +/- 2.7 percent.

Key findings of the survey:
-end-
NOTE TO REPORTERS - The survey results and complete list of questions are located on Science Progress - http://www.scienceprogress.org/2008/12/science-and-law-enforcement.

A teleconference for reporters with Dr. Michael Stebbins of FAS and Dr. Vahid Majidi of the FBI is scheduled on Tuesday, 23 December 2008, from 11:30 am - noon EST. To join the conference call, please dial the toll-free number for the US and Canada: (866) 359-7493 and enter the conference code 5114244414. Please RSVP with Monica Amarelo at mamarelo@fas.org or 202-454-4680.

Interviews are available upon request. To schedule an interview with Dr. Michael Stebbins, director of the FAS Biosecurity Project, please contact Monica Amarelo at mamarelo@fas.org or (202) 454-4680. To schedule an interview with Dr. Vahid Majidi of the FBI, please contact Brian Hale in the Office of Public Affairs at the Federal Bureau of Investigation at (202) 324-3691.

About FAS: The Federation of American Scientists (www.fas.org) was formed in 1945 by atomic scientists from the Manhattan Project. Endorsed by 70 Nobel Laureates in biology, chemistry, economics, medicine and physics as sponsors, FAS addresses a broad spectrum of national security issues in carrying out its mission to promote humanitarian uses of science and technology.

Conference Call with Dr. Michael Stebbins and Dr. Vahid Majidi on Tuesday, 23 December 2008 from 11:30 am - noon EST. To RSVP please contact Monica Amarelo at mamarelo@fas.org or 202-454-4680.

Federation of American Scientists

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