2/3 of Australians unlikely to get vaccinated against swine flu

December 22, 2009

Australia risks a serious swine flu (H1N1 influenza virus) outbreak with two-thirds (65 per cent) of unprotected Australians stating they're unlikely to get vaccinated against the disease in the next 12 months, according to an MBF Healthwatch Poll.

"While the number of new cases of swine flu in Australia might have waned since last winter, the disease is still a major threat," Bupa Australia* Chief Medical Officer, Dr Christine Bennett warned.

Despite the public health campaign, the statistics found that Australians are still confused about their level of risk of contracting swine flu and the effectiveness of the vaccine. Many people also said they were reluctant to get vaccinated, with the most common reasons given being:Since the swine flu outbreak, Australia has had more than 37,000 confirmed cases and 191 deaths as a result of the disease.

"The number of cases and deaths from this disease is increasing at an alarming rate into the winter months in the northern hemisphere, with more than 22 million people in the USA infected and 10,500 people dying from the disease," Dr Bennett said.

"It is highly likely, with the increase in the numbers of Australians travelling overseas and an influx of overseas visitors to Australia over the summer months, that we could see a spike in new cases here."

"While swine flu can be a relatively mild disease for most, it can also kill and make people sick enough to end up in intensive care on life support," said Dr Bennett, who especially urges people with underlying health conditions that put them at higher risk to not delay getting the free vaccination.

The poll found that, in terms of people at higher risk, only 33 per cent with asthma or lung disease, 45 per cent with diabetes, 28 per cent with reduced immunity, and 40 per cent with heart disease had been vaccinated.

Of people planning to travel to the northern hemisphere over the summer holidays, 71 per cent were not intending to get vaccinated against the disease.

"It is worrying that the majority of people, even those most at risk of complications, haven't been vaccinated and don't intend to protect themselves in the coming year. Pregnant women are a group for whom this condition has been particularly serious where complications from swine flu seriously threaten their health and their unborn baby," she added.

With the recent availability of a vaccine for children from 6 months, Dr Bennett encouraged parents to get children under 10 years vaccinated, in particular, as they have accounted for one in five swine flu cases and a quarter of all hospitalisations. For parents and carers of children younger than six months, they should consider getting the vaccine themselves.

"We know from our research that people seem uninformed and confused about the risk of catching swine flu, its potential consequences and about whether it is advisable to be vaccinated," Dr Bennett said, "The best protection you can afford yourself and others is to get vaccinated against swine flu."

Bupa Australia offers the following five simple ways to protect against catching and spreading cold and flu:
-end-
Visit www.MBF.com.au/wellness to download MBF Australia's fact sheets on swine flu or visit the Australian government website www.healthemergency.gov.au for further information.

* Bupa Australia operates the trusted and respected brands MBF, HBA, Mutual Community and ClearView.

Notes to editors

The MBF Healthwatch poll is a nationally representative poll of 1,200 Australians aged 16 and over conducted by NewsPoll on the weekend of December 12-13, 2009.

For all media inquiries, please contact:
Rachel McConaghy
Media and Corporate Communications Manager
Mobile: 0421 762 140
rmcconaghy@reputationmatters.net.au

About MBF

MBF has been looking after Australians for more than 60 years. As a leading private health insurer, our primary aim is to help all Australians live longer, healthier and happier lives.

MBF proudly covers around 1.7 million Australians - giving them the confidence to better manage their healthcare needs. We have a broad range of quality health insurance products and an extensive national member centre network. Recently, we were independently assessed by CANNEX and named the national winner of the Outstanding Value Private Health Insurance Award.

In addition to private health insurance, MBF offers life and travel insurance, as well as financial planning, superannuation and managed investment products through ClearView Retirement Solutions.

About Bupa Australia

Bupa Australia is a leading healthcare provider. With a significant presence in every Australian state and territory, the company operates under the trusted and respected brands, HBA, MBF, Mutual Community and Clearview, proudly covering over three million Australians.

Bupa Australia is driven by the vision of "Taking care of the lives in our hands". The company is focused on providing sustainable health insurance and financial services solutions that represent real value to customers, and on leading the industry in the promotion of preventive health and wellness.

Bupa Australia's products and services include cover for hospital, medical, ancillary and ambulance services, as well as travel, life, car and home insurance, and retirement planning and lifestyle management services.

As part of the international Bupa Group, Bupa Australia draws on the strength and expertise of an international healthcare leader. The Bupa Group covers more than 10 million people in more 200 countries and provides other health and financial services to many more millions of customers around the globe.

Research Australia

Related Vaccine Articles from Brightsurf:

Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first?
Nineteen global health experts from around the world have proposed a new, three-phase plan for vaccine distribution -- called the Fair Priority Model -- which aims to reduce premature deaths and other irreversible health consequences from COVID-19.

Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers.

How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization.

US inroads to better Ebola vaccine
As the world focuses on finding a COVID-19 vaccine, research continues on other potentially catastrophic pandemic diseases, including Ebola and Marburg viruses.

Successful MERS vaccine in mice may hold promise for COVID-19 vaccine
In a new study, published April 7 in mBio, researchers from the University of Iowa and the University of Georgia demonstrate that a new vaccine fully protects mice against a lethal dose of MERS, a close cousin of COVID-19.

Coronavirus Vaccine: Where are we and what's next? (video)
You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle.

Why isn't there a vaccine for staph?
A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine
New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.

Lifetime flu vaccine?
Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu.

On the horizon: An acne vaccine
A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology reports important steps that have been taken towards the development of an acne vaccine.

Read More: Vaccine News and Vaccine Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.